Sector

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Sector

Used to characterize a group of securities that are similar with respect to maturity, type, rating, industry, and/or coupon.

Sector

A set of securities or individual companies that are similar to each other. For example, all automotive companies in the United States are said to belong to the American automotive sector. See also: Industry.

sector

A group of securities (such as airline stocks) that share certain common characteristics. Stocks that are particularly interest-sensitive are considered a sector.

Sector.

A sector is a segment of the economy that includes companies providing the same types of products or services.

For example, the utility sector provides electric power, natural gas, water, or a combination of these services. This sector may also include companies who produce power and those that trade it.

Companies within a sector tend to be reasonably consistent in their average earnings per share, price/earnings ratios (P/Es), and other fundamentals. But fundamentals may differ substantially from one sector to another. For example, some sectors are cyclical, rising and falling with changes in the economy while others are defensive, maintaining their strength despite economic ups and downs.

Since there's no official list of sectors, there can be confusion about how many sectors there are, what they're called, and what companies are included in them. For example, transportation is sometimes a standalone sector and sometimes included as part of the industrial sector.

Sector indexes, some of which are broad while others are very narrow, track many of the major sectors of the economy.

sector

a part of the economy that has certain common characteristics that enable it to be separated from other parts of the economy for analytical or policy purposes. A broad division may be made, for example, between economic activities undertaken by the state (the PUBLIC SECTOR) and those that are undertaken by private individuals and businesses (the PRIVATE SECTOR). The private sector, in turn, may be subdivided into the PERSONAL SECTOR (private individuals and households), the CORPORATE SECTOR (businesses supplying goods and services) and the FINANCIAL SECTOR (businesses providing financial services).
References in periodicals archive ?
4) For plan years beginning before this date but after 1986 (when section 414(r) was enacted), an employer qualifies as operating separate lines of business if the employer "reasonably determines" that it meets the requirements of section 414(r) (other than the requirements of administrative scrutiny under section 414(r)(2)(C)), or complies with the terms of the regulations under that section (with the same exception of the administrative scrutiny requirement).
In the most recent cycle, carriers adopted a strategy of entering specialty lines of business to increase profits.
As envisioned by the regulation, each employer will have to undertake a massive, annual survey of hundreds and perhaps thousands of employees to determine which lines of business they provided services to and the extent of those services.
Companies that maintain such centralized support functions may still have difficulty satisfying the separate management test if the support staff are highly compensated and perform more than 25% but less than 75% of their services for the lines of business.
With Rhythmyx 6, content can be easily managed across multiple sites, multiple channels and multiple lines of business in order to ensure consistency of brand and customer experience.
Bell Atlantic's other lines of business include wireless, business systems, software systems, international, and financial services.
The Guidewire Insurance Suite[TM] consists of Guidewire ClaimCenter, Guidewire PolicyCenter[R], and Guidewire BillingCenter[TM], which provide a modern, web-based platform for all lines of business.
Figure 1: Insurance BPO services by lines of business globally, 2002-2008
Table 5: Application development outsourcing by lines of business, 2002-2008
With the current solution banks can either go for streamlining their pricing and billing functions for a line of business across geographies or, go for a turnkey rollout of Relationship-based pricing and billing for all lines of business and geographies.
Best expects results in individual lines of business to improve over the next few years.
Although the suitability of outsourcing to achieve business objectives varies by lines of business.