line chart

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Line Chart

In technical analysis, a chart that shows a security's price over a period of time, such as a day, a month, or a year. A line chart is constructed by placing points representing the price at different points in time, and then connecting the points with lines. It is useful in showing a security's trend over time. However, it does nothing to indicate the security's high, low, open, or close.

line chart

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line
In technical analysis, a chart pattern indicating successive variable stock values over time. For example, a line chart of a stock would display the stock's closing prices over a period of time, connected by a line. Line charts for graphing stock prices are useful if an analyst is interested only in a single value each time. But if high, low, and closing prices all are required, a bar chart is used. Compare point-and-figure chart. See also 200-day moving average.
References in periodicals archive ?
This can be represented in the histogram and line charts as red zones.
This indicates that frame-16 observation which are actually simulated or produced from frame-8 have a strong positive relationship that is also observed in the line charts.
Aspose team has improved the charting support and issues related to line charts and chart data labels.
Line charts work well with time series; bar charts and scatter plots best represent distribution or deviation; and pie charts are ideal for comparing a part to a whole.
Scatter plots are best to show distribution or deviation; line charts are good at showing time series; pie charts are good at illustrating a part compared to the whole; and bar charts are good at showing ranking, part to whole, deviation, or distribution.
For instance, pie chart is a good way to express percentage share for several categories while line charts are illustrate trends over time.
Cairo points to statistical charts developed at the end of the 18th century by the Scottish engineer William Playfair, who developed some of the basic representations we use today to depict information, like line charts and pie charts.
The three line charts of averages in Figure 5 are similar in tendency.
Customers can create line charts and bar charts based on tables.
Some of the line charts highlight the cyclical nature of productivity, which generally declines in recessions and rises during expansions.
The traditional solution is to change the chart type for the secondary axis to be line charts.