Lemon

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Lemon

An investment with poor results.

Lemon

1. Informal; an investment that performs exceptionally poorly, especially when the poor performance was completely unforeseen.

2. Informal; a product that does not perform as promised. For example, if one buys a car and it stops running on the way home from the dealership, that car is said to be a lemon.

lemon

A poorly performing investment. Many technology stocks became lemons during the 2000 and 2001 bear market.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The mineral reserve and resource estimates were conducted in-house by the Limon geological staff.
There are several areas near the Limon Mine with the potential to host additional gold deposits.
It is a "movement of struggle for dignity, to stop a monopoly, and prevent serious harm to the people of Limon," the union statement said.
Limon describes this process of cognitive blending as "theatrical osmosis" (60), and he resists understanding theater as a fictional mirror held up to nature; nor is the audience perception of a play simply a mirror image of what is implied on stage.
Chrissie Gittins and Helen Limon will be reading at the Day to Celebrate Children's Literature event in Newcastle University's Percy Building from 12.
One lucky lady and three friends will be invited to Glasgow by Bacardi Limon on June 9 and will start the day in true style with a shopping spree at Warehouse, where all four will select outfits for the ceremony.
After September 11, they decided to have the refugee program undergo a security review," explains Limon.
Limon was, in contrast, adult manhood at its finest, a perfect mix of power and grace, tall and classically proportioned, in the Greek sense rather than the balletic--not to mention the Indian cheekbones, the rugged jawline.
Jerzy Limon writes in defense of Tybalt that he does not intend to kill Mercutio but instead thrusts awry when making every effort to avoid so much as scratching Romeo's sudden, third-party interposition between the two duelists.
Despite the naive assumption that war (or science, he adds) is uncontainable in literature, Limon follows with a fascinating proposition, also double-sided: not only does war constitute an invisible center of gravity for American literary history (shaping the classics of realism and modernism by its very absence), but when it is the overt subject of post-World War II and Vietnam-era novels, it is represented best by narrative indirection and failure, writing that is both performative extension of war and hyper-mediated evasion of it.
Thus the society which developed in Limon was an English-speaking enclave of white North American managers and black Jamaican workers, with a culture and history quite distinct from the rest of Costa Rica, although inevitably intertwined.
Cet article examine la reaction des dirigeants de la communaute antillaise et du gouvernement de Costa Rica devant la proliferation des sectes religieuses a Limon durant les annees trente.