Lift


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Lift

An increase in securities prices, as shown by some economic indicator.

Lift

1. An increase in price.

2. An increase in the measure of some economic indicator.

3. See: Uptick.
References in classic literature ?
Pocket got his hands in his hair again, and this time really did lift himself some inches out of his chair.
Then, he melted into parental tenderness, and gave them a shilling apiece and told them to go and play; and then as they went out, with one very strong effort to lift himself up by the hair he dismissed the hopeless subject.
Under-powered craft, we are told, can ascend to the limit of their lift, mail-packets to look out for them accordingly; the lower lanes westward are pitting very badly, "with frequent blow-outs, vortices, laterals, etc.
Our turbines scream shrilly; the propellers cannot bite on the thin air; Tim shunts the lift out of five tanks at once and by sheer weight drives her bullet wise through the maelstrom till she cushions with jar on an up-gust, three thousand feet below.
and so down I plumped on the lift side of her leddyship, to be aven with the willain.
And that's jist the thruth of the rason why he wears his lift hand in a sling.
Many of the men were able, in this manner, to lift four or five hundred pounds, while some succeeded with as high as six hundred.
Flambeau, quite bewildered with this fanaticism, could not refrain from asking Miss Pauline (with direct French logic) why a pair of spectacles was a more morbid sign of weakness than a lift, and why, if science might help us in the one effort, it might not help us in the other.
I looked for the boat, and, while Wolf Larsen cleared the boat- tackles, saw it lift to leeward on a big sea an not a score of feet away.
Again she struggled all over like a fish, and her shoulders setting the saddle heaving, she rose on her front legs but unable to lift her back, she quivered all over and again fell on her side.
A few minutes before the end he asked me to lift him on his pillow, to see the sun rise through the window.
Lift it out, Tom; but I'll just lift up these deeds,--they're the deeds o' the house and mill, I suppose,--and see what there is under 'em.