Lifetime Employment


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Lifetime Employment

A situation in which an employee is practically guaranteed to keep his/her job. A person with lifetime employment may only be fired for gross violations such as sexual harassment or chronic absenteeism. Work performance has little or no bearing. Lifetime employment is rare except in the government sector and some nonprofits, though law firm partners may be said to have lifetime employment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Ouchi's Theory Z, for example, seven major characteristics of Japanese organizations were described; among them lifetime employment, collective decision-making, collective responsibility, and holistic concern are of particular interest.
In an unheard-of move in a nation with lifetime employment, he announced the closure of three Nissan assembly plants by 2001 and two powertrain operations by 2002.
Lifetime employment is one of the most distinctive and controversial aspects of Japanese management.
more farsighted - investments and routinely offered lifetime employment opportunities.
Its practical consequence is to guarantee lifetime employment (and we're talking about long working lives) to the highest-paid, and, as Mr.
The contract also includes a $70,000 buyout offer for about 90 typographers with lifetime employment guarantees, the story says.
The second section will show by an example the interdependence of workers in an organization and point out that lifetime employment is an institutional method of promoting co-operation.
The argument in favor of eliminating tenure is essentially that tenure - or the guarantee of lifetime employment - "demotivates" faculty and causes "deadwood.
Japanese companies have been self-perpetuating institutions which have subordinated stock price and corporate profitability for market share and lifetime employment.
These were found in the practices of lifetime employment, seniority based wages and promotion, twice yearly bonuses and various company social welfare systems.
After reviewing more than 100 Publications on business in Japan, the conclusion is that three characteristics predominate in Japanese management thinking: harmony and group loyalty, consensus decision making, and lifetime employment.
Norihiko Suzuki's paper explains the state of employment of white-collar workers, including managers, whose security had always been thought intact under the so-called lifetime employment system, but has come increasingly under threat during the deep recession of the 1990s, when Japanese companies resorted to severe restructuring.
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