Life insurance

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Life insurance

An insurance policy that pays a monetary benefit to the insured person's survivors after death.

Life Insurance

An insurance policy where, in exchange for a premium, the insurance company pays a certain benefit to the survivors of the policyholder upon his/her death. Life insurance can help defray costs of the funeral, pay off the estate's debts, and may provide for the survivors' (notably a widow or widower) future. There are two main types of life insurance. Term life insurance lasts only for a certain period of time and pays the death benefit only if the policyholder dies during that time. Whole life insurance lasts as long as the policyholder remains alive and provides a savings component against which the policyholder can borrow under most circumstances.

Life insurance.

Life insurance is a contract you sign with an insurance company, obligating it to pay a death benefit of a certain value to the beneficiaries you name.

In most cases, the payment is made at the time of your death, but certain policies allow you to take a portion of the death benefit if you are terminally ill and need the money to pay for healthcare.

You may select either term or permanent insurance. With a term policy, you are insured for a specific period of time. When the term ends, you must renew the policy for another term or change your coverage. Otherwise, you're no longer insured. With a permanent policy, you can buy coverage for your lifetime.

You pay an annual premium, typically billed monthly or quarterly, for the coverage. The insurer sets the cost, based on your age, health, lifestyle, and other factors. With a permanent policy, your premium is fixed, but with a term policy it typically increases when you renew your coverage to reflect the fact that you're older.

References in periodicals archive ?
Accenture's review of recent share pricing trends reveals that most life insurers are selling at less than book value--meaning, essentially, that investors are betting that life insurers will destroy rather than create shareholder value in the next few years.
Life insurers, which were fully allowed to sell insurance products at banks in December 2007 as part of the relaxation of regulations, have been accelerating efforts to develop such products.
4, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Council of Life Insurers (ACLI) is extremely disappointed by the Financial Stability Oversight Council's (FSOC) designation today of another life insurance company, MetLife, as a systemically important financial institution (SIFI).
Life insurers are major institutional investors and fluctuations of share prices affect their financial health.
life insurers is concentrated in investments in RMBS, CDOs and other ABS that are backed by residential mortgages.
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The demutualization mechanism would enable financially troubled life insurers to conduct management integration with other insurers or bolster their depleted capital bases far more easily, it said.
Although the share price index hovered between 7,616 points and 8,237 over the past few two months, domestic life insurers have increased investment in the domestic bourse.
Japan's top 10 life insurers reported as of Tuesday a 3.
credit-rating agency announced the stance in view of a proposal by a government advisory panel to allow Japanese life insurers to reduce the guaranteed yields as a way to assist the troubled insurance sector.
SBLI also led all life insurers in the state in 2005 in total number of policies in force, number of new policies issued, insurance issued, and net growth in insurance in force.
EDS: ADDING MORE INFORMATION) Japan's top 10 life insurers on Monday reported declines in their solvency margins, the result of severe business conditions marked by negative spreads between their guaranteed yields to policyholders and returns on their own investments.