Life Beneficiary

Life Beneficiary

A person designated in will to receive a certain asset or instrument for the remainder of his/her life. For example, in a will, a farmer may grant ownership of his farm to his children, but they may not take possession of it while their mother is alive. In this situation, the mother is the life beneficiary and has the right to live in the farm house for the rest of her life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The settlor may designate the settlor's spouse as life beneficiary who may then utilize the premises in that capacity during the beneficiary's lifetime.
Helping to make a difference, Subaru dealers are teaming up with their local Dining Out For Life beneficiary to make this annual event a nationwide success.
The capital was, on the death of the life beneficiary, added to the estate, and inheritance tax chargeable on that amount.
If a donor designates himself or herself as the life beneficiary (the person who benefits from the trust during his or her lifetime), then the account of the life beneficiary is subject to certain limitations.
Martha Allen was the life beneficiary of the trust, making her the sole recipient of all income derived from the trust investments until her death.
For example, if a total return unitrust provides for payment of five percent of the trust assets to the lifetime beneficiary and the trust is $1 million, the annual distribution to the life beneficiary is $50,000.
The decedent was a life beneficiary of a testamentary trust created by her deceased husband.
This risk could be mitigated by naming a joint life beneficiary.
2056(b)-5(f)(1) states that a surviving spouse is regarded as "entitled for life to all of the income" from the trust property only if she has that degree of beneficial enjoyment of the property that is accorded a person who is unqualifiably designated as a life beneficiary.