Libertarianism


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Libertarianism

A political philosophy characterized by minimalist governance. Libertarians favor little or no government intervention in the economy beyond basic protection of property rights. They also strongly oppose perceived infringements of civil liberties. For example, a libertarian would likely oppose the indefinite detention of a suspected subversive without charges.
References in periodicals archive ?
For me, the weight of the argument favors Schlueter's conservatism over Wenzel's libertarianism.
Regardless of the consensus that Anselm scholars may eventually reach concerning the validity of Rogers's interpretation of Anselm's writings, her presentation of Anselmian libertarianism offers a new position in current free will debates that will be long debated.
He sees that "the attraction of libertarianism is its clarity and simplicity" but rightly resists the temptation to reduce conservatism to a set of simplistic axioms applicable to any and all circumstances.
Libertarianism faces a problem with the notion that animals have no rights whatsoever; that they are considered as no different than an inanimate object, such as the aforementioned couch.
Chicagonomics gives him a lot of attention, perhaps because the book is as much interested in libertarianism as it is in economics.
The examination of these hard cases is what helps us sharpen our understanding of libertarianism and our ability to debate and defend the free society.
Given the insuperable difficulty of the public/private evidential divide here, such a narrative support of libertarianism could hardly end otherwise.
The book is organized as a set of responses to questions interlocutors of various sorts might have about libertarianism.
This is a complete and utter misconstrual of libertarianism.
According to libertarianism, the market--not government bureaucrats--will decide what business ought to go where, what is residential and what is not.
Protracted conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, a new military engagement in Libya, bankers in China, and jihadists in Pakistan--now, more than ever, appears to be the opportunity for a new approach to foreign policy, one based on the principles of libertarianism as espoused by its most prominent national leaders, Texas Representative Ron Paul and his son, Rand Paul, the new senator from Kentucky.
Yet looking back today, can we say that the triumph of libertarianism was beneficial?
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