Libertarianism


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Libertarianism

A political philosophy characterized by minimalist governance. Libertarians favor little or no government intervention in the economy beyond basic protection of property rights. They also strongly oppose perceived infringements of civil liberties. For example, a libertarian would likely oppose the indefinite detention of a suspected subversive without charges.
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Rothbard (1926-1995) was the leading theorist of radical Lockean libertarianism combined with Austrian economics, which demonstrates that free markets produce widespread prosperity, social cooperation, and economic coordination without monopoly, depression, or inflation--evils whose roots are to be found in government intervention.
Readers will develop a clearer understanding of libertarianism, as well as its limits.
It is therefore not surprising that he is happy to link libertarianism with commitment to feminism, same-sex marriage, and adoption rights for same-sex couples (pp.
In that way we move away from libertarianism, real libertarianism, and direct libertarianism, not toward them.
For all its emphasis on the core American values of small government and individual liberty, however, it would be fair to say that libertarianism has long been considered "the crazy uncle of American politics," as Christopher Beam wrote in New York magazine.
In several major aspects of biblical ethics, many would suggest that libertarianism falls short.
If that is the case, libertarianism cannot be justified as a philosophy of pure freedom, as it is actually a complex mixture of freedom and unfreedom, much like other philosophies.
Yet far too often, Hudson gives an inaccurate picture of libertarianism.
I am nothing short of astonished that such a piece is published here in the heart of the West, where libertarianism and pro-business Republicanism thrive.
The Corinthians have developed a particularly nasty strain of libertarianism in response to the gospel's gift of freedom.
The 37 papers presented, previously published between 1994 and 2005 in international law journals and a few other sources, are organized into sections discussing broad legal issues of the Internet; regulation of cyberspace, including subsections on self- regulation and digital libertarianism, self-regulation and industry governance, code as law, and contract and private ordering; digital constitutionalism; jurisdiction; content regulation; intellectual property, including subsections on copyright and patents; e-commerce and competition policy; privacy; spam; and intermediary liability.
Second, the book challenges the main substantive assertions by Francois Furet and others that the Revolution, despite a nod to libertarianism, became quickly absorbed in egalitarian concerns that led directly to the Terror.
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