Libertarianism

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Libertarianism

A political philosophy characterized by minimalist governance. Libertarians favor little or no government intervention in the economy beyond basic protection of property rights. They also strongly oppose perceived infringements of civil liberties. For example, a libertarian would likely oppose the indefinite detention of a suspected subversive without charges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism.
Block, Walter (2009A), "Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism," in Hulsmann, Jorg Guido and Stephan Kinsella (eds.
Although libertarian theory could be used to support the rights of Medicare beneficiaries to health care coverage of which pharmaceuticals is a part, the theory would not support redistribution.
However, the duration of any individual's control over an appropriated resource must be neither too short nor too long if property rights are to play their role in libertarian theory.
In The Libertarian Idea he examines libertarian theory anew.
Libertarian theory does not directly respond to the challenge of the rising number of uninsured.
My conclusion was that libertarian theory provides no decisive reason to reject the majority opinion that "at some point in its development (perhaps at the point of consciousness), the fetus enjoys or nearly enjoys FMS, and that good cause must then exist to justify an abortion" (Friedman 2015: 159; emphasis in original).
Animal torture has had a bandit-like existence in libertarian theory.
The generally libertarian character of the Brennan symposium will be obvious to anyone familiar with libertarian theory, and it dovetails with some important work on libertarianism in the rest of the issue.
Block, Walter (2009B), "Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism," in Hulsmann, Jorg Guido, and Stephan Kinsella (eds.
It is admittedly unrealistic to expect the general public to appreciate all the ins and outs of every sophisticated application of libertarian theory.
Seavey's libertarian can have no complaint, qua libertarian, so long as property rights, conceived along the lines of a certain kind of idiosyncratic libertarian theory, are observed.
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