Libertarianism

(redirected from Libertarian theory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Libertarianism

A political philosophy characterized by minimalist governance. Libertarians favor little or no government intervention in the economy beyond basic protection of property rights. They also strongly oppose perceived infringements of civil liberties. For example, a libertarian would likely oppose the indefinite detention of a suspected subversive without charges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of this would no doubt derive from existing doctrines and case law, in cases where those doctrines and case laws are consistent with the overarching libertarian theory.
Although libertarian theory could be used to support the rights of Medicare beneficiaries to health care coverage of which pharmaceuticals is a part, the theory would not support redistribution.
140-41; Stephan Kinsella, "A Libertarian Theory of Contract: Title Transfer, Binding Promises, and Inalienability," 17 J.
It is difficult to see how any such requirement can be reconciled with libertarian theory, which clearly eschews all such positive obligations.
30) For a deontological libertarian analysis of weapons, see Walter Block and Matthew Block, "Toward a Universal Libertarian Theory of Gun (Weapon) Control," Ethics, Place, and Environment 3, no.
1663 (1993); but see also Block, Toward a Libertarian Theory of Blackmail: Reply to DeLong, J.
Following the decline and collapse of the Soviet Union and other communist states and amid growing doubts about the welfare state, the editors and contributors to Liberty for the 21st Century take the fin de siecle as an occasion for a new statement of libertarian theory, with the hope that it may become the dominant voice in the next century.
One well-known libertarian theory of acquisition, going back to John Locke, is roughly this: one owns one's labor and comes to own a previously unowned part of the natural world by "mixing" his labor with it, with the qualification (the "Lockean proviso") that in doing so one leaves resources for others to appropriate that are as good and as plentiful as those one has appropriated.
They don't "focus on the immigration influx in practice, as opposed to libertarian theory," as National Review acidly puts it.
Surely libertarian theory provides for engaging agents in one's defense.
Roderick Long's essay, "Toward a Libertarian Theory of Class," raises the question, What is such a theory, and why do we need one, once we unhook the subject from Marx or from the Ancient Regime?
The first substantive criticism of Block (2010C) by Wisniewski (2010B) concerns the role of "gentleness" in libertarian theory.
Full browser ?