Liberalism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Liberalism: Marxism, conservatism

Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, I am unconvinced of the assertion that social democracy is of the same tradition as liberalism.
He examines the making of modern liberalism but does not look at really existing liberalism--the world of cultural change that has emerged in the last two hundred years.
Under Kennedy, liberalism began to become more stylistic than programmatic.
In Ryan's account, liberalism places a high value on liberty and equality.
Because both rights are in a continual state of flux and readjustment due to the shifting forces of globalization, it has become increasingly difficult for liberalism to work out an appropriate balance between them.
Her point that "constitutional liberalism in practice is both thick and thin" (10) is one missed by Kersch, who views our approach to rights justification as moving immediately to full respect and appreciation and leaving out steps along the way.
This book shows that liberalism became the major ideological reference for anti-Peronist politicians and intellectuals.
But Taylor's sweeping rejection of political liberalism sometimes seems unnecessarily strident and rigid.
She argues that to focus on liberalism as a "proactive motivating ideology" during times of great conflict misses the very different way in which liberalism was lived as a set of daily local practices and institutions (p.
The work is bold in challenging Augustinian realism, the dominant strand of Augustinian liberalism of the past 50 years or so, and in attempting to read Augustine as an ally rather than as an enemy of certain core affirmations of feminism, particularly regarding the ethics of care.
Thus the latter produces utter economic scarcity, while liberalism stands for economic vigor, creativity, and efficiency.
Liberalism is increasingly characterized by an "elevated" perspective.