Liberalism

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Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course there are always going to be the trendy liberal thinkers who complain that traditional methods don't work.
What Ingrid Makus shows is that the three great liberal thinkers, Hobbes, Locke and Mill, propose arrangements for children that are incompatible with their principles of liberal equality for women.
Liberal thinkers such as Schillebeeckx and Kung are fairly judged to offer weak cumulative cases for Jesus' uniqueness because of a diffuseness of argument.
Muslim liberal thinkers, secularists and Westernized writers have always been looked upon as renegades from Islam.
The Hillman Foundation, by its financial support of progressive causes and the achievements of liberal thinkers and doers, is a worthy testimonial to his memory.
But in the space of 30 pages, Chomsky restores Smith to his place among the great liberal thinkers who saw, in human labor and self-determination, the roots of a truly human society.
Eighteenth-century liberal thinkers had developed the idea of equality, but they had not held it applicable within the family.
This experience terrified Egypt's liberal thinkers, making even the most liberal a lot more conservative than they were before 2011.
It's clear that the thin layer of liberal thinkers in Pakistan is getting thinner by the day.
These essays offer insightful and lively commentary on two important liberal thinkers written by a master of modern prose.
Liberal thinkers, who were, therefore, preoccupied with the preservation of liberty in a post-revolutionary world, investigated such prerequisites of liberty as constitutional government and the rule of law, the necessary limits on power, the institutional foundations of a free political regime, or the dependence of liberty on morality and religion.
Khire's interview also brings to the fore an idea that several activists and liberal thinkers have been trying to advocate: that the advocacy of LGBT rights is not divorced from the advocacy of human rights in general; that the fight for queer rights is as much the responsibility of straight people as of the queer people themselves.