Liberalism

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Related to Liberal theory: Liberal Theory of State, Marxist Theory

Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the thesis of liberal theory are: first, the international system isn't anarchic; UN exists and the whole structure of institutions and transnational organization.
Moreover, he believes that the disadvantages caused by cultural membership are "unchosen inequalities", and a plausible liberal theory of justice should rectify them.
8) Will Kymlicka, Multicultural Citizenship: A Liberal Theory of Minority Rights (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995); Michael McConnell, "Accommodation of Religion and a Response to the Critics," George Washington Law Review 60 (1992), pp.
Writing in the wake of the end of the Cold War and the incorporation of the Socialist Bloc into capitalist style democracies, Fukuyama argued that there was no ideological alternative to liberal theory and that human society had come to the end of their philosophical evolution (Fukuyama, F.
A theory that made those born abroad less morally valuable than those born at home would, quite simply, not count as a liberal theory To be sure, liberal theorists frequently defend distinct rights and duties for citizens in contrast to foreigners.
Moreover, initially the distinction between the thin and thick views of the human self was intended as a criticism of the theoretical inadequacy of liberal theory and the tendency of liberalism to foster deracinated individualism.
the lawyers and philosophers who constructed the liberal theory of
Dori Kimel, From Promise to Contract: Towards a Liberal Theory of Contract (Oxford: Hart, 2003).
The history of the idea of religious toleration seems to be particularly susceptible to teleological interpretations of progress; the pressure for finding an "inevitable" development toward liberty has afflicted not only Whig historians of the past, but many political scientists of the present as well, particularly proponents of modern liberal theory.
Exemplary care of persons with disabilities abounds, but it reveals the inconsistencies of liberal theory and social practices.
6) This essay suggests that natural law affords a more complete and balanced understanding of marriage and family life than the present mainstream perspective, which has its roots in liberal theory.
Thus far, we have looked at two criticisms principally rooted in international law as we find it: that Rawls's theoretical account fails to fully recognize important changes in international legal doctrine with respect to state sovereignty and human rights, changes with important normative consequences for a liberal theory of international justice.