Legend


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Legend

1. A statement, often on a stock certificate, indicating the restrictions of ownership on the share. Many stocks do not have legends, but those that do usually place them directly on the certificate. Others include the legend on a separate document that is traded along with the stock.

2. On a chart, an explanation of the symbols used. For example, given a candlestick chart, a legend may say that white candles represent trading days with gains and black candles represent trading days with losses.
References in classic literature ?
I got him on the subject of the legends , and he went off at once into a sort of sermon.
Before my eyes was a horrible monster worthy to figure in the legends of the marvellous.
My old friend's legends will scarcely kill the hours 'twixt this and bedtime.
We must efface the legend," said Pittrino, in a melancholy tone.
worm' was a monster of vast size and power--a veritable dragon or serpent, such as legend attributes to vast fens or quags where there was illimitable room for expansion.
But it seems rather odd," said Flambeau, "that it should exactly confirm the old legend.
Poor but honest parents--that is all right--never mind the particulars-- go on with the legend.
It was a hazardous, though maybe a gallant thing to do, since it is probable that the legend commonly received has had no small share in the growth of Strickland's reputation; for there are many who have been attracted to his art by the detestation in which they held his character or the compassion with which they regarded his death; and the son's well-meaning efforts threw a singular chill upon the father's admirers.
For a legend runs that the king, fearful that he would bring others to attack them, sent a party after him to slay him.
And his wife dealt out stockings, and calico shirts, and smock frocks, and comforting drinks to the old folks with the "rheumatiz," and good counsel to all; and kept the coal and clothes' clubs going, for yule-tide, when the bands of mummers came round, dressed out in ribbons and coloured paper caps, and stamped round the Squire's kitchen, repeating in true sing-song vernacular the legend of St.
For many hundred years before that time, there had been handed down, from age to age, an old legend, that the illustrious prince being afflicted with leprosy, on his return from reaping a rich harvest of knowledge in Athens, shunned the court of his royal father, and consorted moodily with husbandman and pigs.
It is entitled THE LEGENDS OF THE RHINE FROM BASLE TO ROTTERDAM, by F.