Left-Hand Side

Left-Hand Side

In foreign exchange, a slang term for selling a currency.
References in classic literature ?
On the left-hand side of the passage there was a drawing-room situated at the back of the house, and communicating with a dining-room in the front.
My left-hand side led to the corridor which communicated with Miss Rachel's room.
Gurth was hurried along agreeably to this mandate, and having been dragged somewhat roughly over the bank, on the left-hand side of the lane, found himself in a straggling thicket, which lay betwixt it and the open common.
Sometimes we slopped along in a narrow path on the left-hand side of the track, but by and by when the fog blew as aside a little and we saw that we were treading the rampart of a precipice and that our left elbows were projecting over a perfectly boundless and bottomless vacancy, we gasped, and jumped for the ties again.
You float along down about twenty miles, and you'll come to a town on the left-hand side of the river.
We all followed him into the housekeeper's room, which stood upon the left-hand side of the passage.
There is no vehicle save a dog-cart which throws up mud in that way, and then only when you sit on the left-hand side of the driver.
Girls and boys, the former on the right, the latter on the left-hand side of the church, filled the stalls of the choir; the priest stood beside the reading-desk; on one stained window of the side-aisle the Holy Ghost hovered over the Virgin; on another one, Mary knelt before the Child Jesus, and behind the alter, a wooden group represented Saint Michael felling the dragon.
As they passed the old church, which stood upon a mound at the left-hand side of the village street the door was flung open, and a stream of worshippers wound down the sloping path, coming from the morning mass, all chattering like a cloud of jays.
I shall leave the city about that time and walk to Charing Cross on the left-hand side of the way; if there are any letters, come and meet me, and bring them with you.
Those of you who did so with their eyes open have been aware, soon after leaving the Didcot station, of a fine range of chalk hills running parallel with the railway on the left-hand side as you go down, and distant some two or three miles, more or less, from the line.
Returning along the passage, on the left-hand side from the stage, and looking about me attentively, I discovered him in the pit.