Layup

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Layup

Used in the context of general equities. Easily executed trade or order. See: Lead pipe.

Layup

Informal; an order to a broker that can be executed easily. Layups are made on highly liquid securities at a reasonable price. A layup is also called a lead pipe.
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Just wanted to let you know that I think your lead pipe editorial in this month's (May) issue was excellent.
Deeb likened the issue of maintaining lead pipe infrastructures to owning a vintage automobile: "You fix it and replace the parts as they wear out to keep it running.
Unfortunately, as the historian Werner Troesken has observed, cities with soft water overwhelmingly chose lead pipes over iron because iron pipes corrode in soft water.
Alerted about the incident, two other Alpha Sigma members identified as Ernesto Luis Pangalangan and Mario Andrefanio Santos II went to the area an hour later but were also attacked by masked men wielding lead pipes who fled in a silver Peugeot van.
You could have lead pipes from when the property was built, some galvanised steel pipes from 1940s alterations, copper pipes from the 1970s and then all the pipework that comes with central heating.
In the United Kingdom, where approximately 40% of homes have lead pipes, partial service line replacement is not widespread, according to corrosion expert Colin Hayes of Swansea University.
Martin Bradley, 45, from Argyle Terrace in Derry has been without tap water while he waits for the firm to give him the OK to carry out vital work on burst lead pipes.
A FAMILY are having medical tests after it emerged they had been drinking water from lead pipes for two years.
But there were still many houses across the country with lead pipes.
The age of a home could affect the lead content in tap water because older homes are more likely to have lead pipes or lead solder in the plumbing.
He said: "Nobody came to us during our very lengthy discussions on the directives on electronic waste and on the removal of hazardous substances from the environment to say that they would affect the lead pipes in traditional organs.
You should be particularly suspicious if your home has lead pipes (lead is a dull gray metal that is soft enough to be easily scratched with a house key)," says the EPA, or "if you see signs of corrosion (frequent leaks, rust-colored water, stained dishes or laundry).