Succession

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Succession

The rules of or process by which a person goes about filling a role previously held by another person. In estates, succession determines who owns the property of the decedent, with everything going to the next of kin in the absence of a will. In business, succession is the process by which one employee, especially a major executive like the CEO, is replaced by another person. In determining succession, a board of directors ought to exercise caution to ensure that an executive is not only competent, but also does not bring any conflicts of interest to the company.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ontario Superior Court of Justice, in 2003, upheld by the Court of Appeal of Ontario in 2005, maintained that the Act of Settlement and other laws of succession are indeed part of the constitutional law of Canada by the principle of received law.
As discussed above, if a morganatic marriage had the effect of denying any children access to the throne, the laws of succession would be altered.
If the assent of the dominions were requested only to confirm any modification in the laws of succession or the royal style and titles, the assent would have no legal effect.
It is therefore not the legal force of the preamble which effected the adoption of the bill to secure the assent to the changes in the laws of succession and the royal style and titles, but rather the emerging convention that the preamble describes.
The laws of succession or the royal style and titles could still be altered merely by the adoption of a bill by the parliament at Westminster.
Meanwhile Princess Eleanor played by Sophie Winkleman (Big Suze from Peep Show) hopes he will screw up royally, so she can raise two fingers to those pesky laws of succession and become Queen in his place.
The millionaire novelist is to introduce a Lords Bill bringing sex equality to the monarchy's 900-year-old laws of succession.