Latino

(redirected from Latinos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Latino

A person in the United States with roots, however defined, in a predominately Spanish-speaking country, especially but not necessarily in Latin America. Latino is an ethnicity rather than a race for U.S. Census Bureau purposes. Latinos form one of the largest American minorities.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Polls on issues, focus groups and surveys to help assess the needs of young Latinos and keep a community pulse on issues impacting children and young Latinos.
But a competitive, do-it-yourself attitude often prevents Latinos from helping one another.
But soon the school, whose student population is made up of blacks and Latinos, saw the students posting some of the worst test scores in the city.
While it is beyond the scope of this paper to fully describe a systematic consultation approach to working with Latino students and families, this paper proposes that current models of consultation do not fully address the specific needs of Latino students in order to achieve the best possible outcomes for this population.
How family reservations can turn to an embrace also rings true for young Latinos in the 2005 BFA graduating class at Miami's New World School of the Arts.
Because according to the Euro-Americans, the Latinos have not only been personally irresponsible by not using their time well, but they have abused time that belongs to the other folks.
In 23 of the 50 states, Latinos outnumber Asian-Americans or African-Americans," he says, "but this is not just an issue for the Hispanic community, it's an issue for all America.
He says most gay Latinos migrate first to Spanish-speaking neighborhoods, where machismo, religion, and homophobia are strong.
Through the author's eyes, we read in searing detail of Latinos throwing Molotov cocktails during the 1992 Los Angeles riots, and of a U.
Blacks and Latinos live side by side, but inhabit two different worlds," writes Suro, referring specifically to Los Angeles.
Thus, while the Latinos had less educational experience and vocational training than the African Americans in this sample, a greater percentage had stronger employment histories.
My interest in Latinos with disabilities and in particular on the use of interpreters is informed not only by my studies but by my personal experiences as well.