Latino

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Latino

A person in the United States with roots, however defined, in a predominately Spanish-speaking country, especially but not necessarily in Latin America. Latino is an ethnicity rather than a race for U.S. Census Bureau purposes. Latinos form one of the largest American minorities.
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The Book of Latina Women is divided into eleven chapters, each of which focuses on Latinas in different influential areas: athletics; the arts; the sciences; television; activism, leadership, and politics; entrepreneurship; writing and editing; the practice of medicine; education; and entertainment.
More information on the 2004 LATINA Style 50 list is available at http://www.
Solo recientemente hemos visto a empresarios en America Latina dispuestos a conquistar el mundo.
Now in its 15th year, this annual report sets the standard for identifying corporations that are providing the best career opportunities for Latinas in the U.
We're proud that LATINA Style has recognized MetLife's strong track record of attracting, developing and retaining a diverse workforce.
It provides a fantastic avenue for recruiting, attracting and retaining highly talented Latinas in the U.
Preparing the LATINA Style 50 Report is an exhausting process that takes intense research and study.
The annual awards ceremony honoring the LATINA Style 50 companies will take place on February 8, 2018 during the 20th Anniversary LATINA Style 50 Awards and Diversity Leaders Conference in Washington, D.
According to the study, Latinas follow brands and bloggers, more than celebrities to learn about cosmetics, fragrance, skin care and hair care.
In 2012, Galan launched the Adelante Movement, which is geared toward empowering Latinas by helping them become businesspersons.
The new initiative aims to extend P&G's "Nueva Latina" campaign, which calls attention to "the unique and complex experience of the modern, bicultural Latina.
Studies about Latinas conducted in the early 2000s found that they were among the biggest groups of high school dropouts and there was a higher risk of them not going on to college, she said.