Landlord


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Landlord

A property owner who rents property to a tenant.

Landlord

A person who owns real estate and rents it to someone, allowing the renter to live and/or use the real estate in exchange for a fee. The fee is also called rent and is usually paid once per month. In exchange for the rent, the landlord is responsible for the basic upkeep of the property. For example, if the roof collapses, the landlord, rather than the renter, must pay for it. Landlords usually may not deduct the interest they pay on the mortgages of their properties from their taxable incomes, but the rent can provide a steady income with little or no actual work. A female landlord is called a landlady. See also: Passive income.

landlord

The owner of property rented to another. The landlord's interest is called a reversionary interest, while the tenant's interest is possessory.

References in classic literature ?
Do you pretend to say, landlord, that this harpooneer is actually engaged this blessed Saturday night, or rather Sunday morning, in peddling his head around this town?
Snell, the landlord, duly put the leading question.
While this was going on there came up to the inn a sowgelder, who, as he approached, sounded his reed pipe four or five times, and thereby completely convinced Don Quixote that he was in some famous castle, and that they were regaling him with music, and that the stockfish was trout, the bread the whitest, the wenches ladies, and the landlord the castellan of the castle; and consequently he held that his enterprise and sally had been to some purpose.
Yes,' said the landlord, 'that's his name, Doctor Wolfe Macfarlane.
But there's no gentleman there," returned the landlord.
The landlord explained that it was probably that of a countess.
Then he took up his cudgel and looked at the landlord as though he would smite him where he stood.
Excepting the case of supper, which could be easily provided, the landlord had no choice but to disappoint both his guests.
At the sound of these fresh voices, and of the tongue in which they spoke, the stranger crashed his dish of nuts down upon the floor, and began himself to call for the landlord until the whole house re-echoed with his roarings.
Not if I knew when I was well off,' said the landlord.
Instead of resenting the affront, therefore, the Quaker was moved with compassion for his unhappy circumstances; and having communicated his opinion to the landlord, he desired him to take great care of his guest, and to treat him with the highest civility.
He was, no doubt, the not very amiable landlord of this charming dwelling-place.