Land Reform

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Land Reform

Any direct action by a government to change who owns land in a country. For example, a government may confiscate property held by large, foreign corporations and distribute it among poor and small farmers. Land reform is highly controversial whenever it is practiced.
References in periodicals archive ?
The land reforms project dates back to the regime of former president Gamal Abdel Nasser, when the government handed several parcels of land to low-income farmers to cultivate, and from which to earn a living.
During the course of proceeding, Punjab government submitted its reply and apprised the bench that land reforms act 1972 and 1977 should not be restored, whereas rest of three provinces did not submit their replies by the apex court.
CJP remarked during the course of hearing of the case " land reforms are in the larger interest of the farmers.
Lovely informed a jubilant gathering that all the pending cases under Section 81 of the Land Reforms Act shall be withdrawn.
The first attempt at land reforms was undertaken by the military regime of Ayub Khan back in 1959.
The Basnet Commission has a number of recommendations based on scientific land reform and claims to be vastly different, more updated, and advanced from earlier ones.
Redistribution of land can promote equity as well, which makes land reforms important for promoting social justice.
The study said land reforms had drastically reduced the area of land under cultivation by 50,000 hectares (123,500 acres) and lands under irrigation also declined more than nine percent to 139,500 hectares.
Land reforms have historically either taken place along collective or else individual household lines, with the latter being predominant and most successful in terms of raising agricultural output.
Among them were about 50 Highland river workers who claim their jobs would be under threat as a result of the Land Reform (Scotland) Bill.
But market-assisted land reforms, championed by institutions such as the World Bank, are threatening sustainable land redistribution in a growing number of countries, the Oakland-based Institute for Food and Development (Food First) warns.
UNDER-FIRE Scottish lairds last night launched a bid to stop the Government implementing radical land reforms.
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