Laissez-Faire Leadership

Laissez-Faire Leadership

A management style in which the manager provides little or no oversight to employees. The manager may be available to answer questions, but, in general, lets the employees perform their work. Laissez-faire leadership works best with employees who are highly competent and/or experienced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laissez-faire leadership was negatively related to transformational leadership.
When researching these two active forms of leadership, they are often contrasted with extremely passive laissez-faire leadership (see, for example, Yammarino & Bass, 1990; Yammarino, Spangler & Bass, 1993).
On the other hand, the three types of leadership style identified by Lewin and Lippitt are: (1) democratic leadership style; (2) autocratic leadership style; and (3) Laissez-faire leadership style (Lewin, Leppitt, & White, 1939).
In certain technical areas, Shaikh Zayed followed laissez-faire leadership style.
Laissez-faire leadership also known as delegative leadership, is a type of leadership style in which leaders are hands-off and allow group members to make the decisions.
Overall, the literature suggests that transactional and transformational leadership styles positively influence team performance, while the laissez-faire leadership style, also called non-leadership, negatively influences or does not influence team performance.
Different styles of leadership include transformational leadership, transactional leadership, laissez-faire leadership and Ethical leadership.
In terms of the full range leadership model, researchers did find that both transactional and laissez-faire leadership were not successful in driving organizational commitment (Othman, Mohammed, & D'Silva, 2013).
The model's current form represents nine single-order factors comprising five transformational leadership factors, three transactional leadership factors, and one for nontransactional laissez-faire leadership.
Whereas, the practice of authoritative and laissez-faire leadership styles and the lack of exercise of leadership behaviours related to transformational and transactional (first dimension only) leadership are considered to be barriers to faculty job satisfaction.