Lachter

Lachter

A German unit of length. Its measure varied in different German-speaking areas, but generally was about two meters. It became obsolete with the adoption of the metric system in the 1870s.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Kent, of the small firm Kent, Haste & Lachter, in Lodnon's Piccadilly, which has made the Duke's suits for half a century, said: "He's got a fabulous physique.
Lachter, Forster and Ruthurff (2004) call the processing of these stimuli (flanks) while the focus is directed elsewhere <<Leakage>>.
The German political analyst Wolfram Lachter thinks the political stalemate in Libya is due to the adoption of the Law of Political Isolation in May 2013, which prohibited the hiring of any high official who had worked during the Qaddafi years in any public or political office.
Lachter, 1971; Nakajima, Urushihara, & Masaki, 2002; Thompson, Iwata, Hanley, Dozier, & Samaha, 2003).
Dennis Lachter, Arshavin's adviser and former agent, said: "We have no problem going to Turkey.
Lachter, Forster y Ruthruff (2004) estiman que el tiempo promedio en el que se dan los desplazamientos involuntarios de atencion es de 50 ms y, que el tiempo en el que ocurren las desviaciones voluntarias de la atencion va desde 150 ms hasta 500 ms.
Uno de los referentes teoricos sobre el funcionamiento del estudio de la atencion selectiva parte del estudio de LACHTER, FORSTER y RUTHURK (2004); estos autores, siguiendo la teoria del filtro selectivo de Broadbent, consideran que la atencion funciona como un filtro y que puede ser dirigida de una fuente de estimulacion a otra.
Furthermore, covert shifts are thought to be faster (50 to 100 ms) than overt saccades (150 ms; see Lachter et al.
Lachter wrote, "Such powerful knowledge of the facts of the brain gave me just the certainty that this unfortunate patient lacked" (Lachter, 2001, p.
Animal studies have found greater variability during extinction than during reinforcement (Antonitis, 1951; Eckerman & Lanson, 1969; Lachter & Corey, 1982; Neuringer, Kornell, & Olufs, 2001; Stokes, 1995), with variability increasing as a function of reinforcer intermittency (Eckerman & Lanson, 1969; Lachter & Corey, 1982).