Taft-Hartley Act

(redirected from Labor-Management Relations Act)
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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most people I talk to (probably like many of you reading this commentary) seem to quit listening as soon as they hear or read about the National Labor Relations Act, Labor-Management Relations Act or the National Labor Relations Board.
6384) immediately prior to the fall election recess that would amend the Labor-Management Relations Act (i.
Any plan, fund, or program which was heretofore or is hereafter established or maintained by an employer or by an employee organization, or by both, to the extent that such plan, fund, or program was established or is maintained for the purpose of providing for its participants or their beneficiaries, through the purchase of insurance or otherwise, (A) medical, surgical, or hospital care or benefits, or benefits in the event of sickness, accident, disability, death or unemployment, or vacation benefits, apprenticeship or other training programs, or day care centers, scholarship funds or prepaid legal services, or (B) any benefit described in [[section] 302(c) of the Labor-Management Relations Act of 1947] (other than pensions or retirement or death, and insurance to write such pensions).
The plaintiffs sought an injunction in district court alleging that El Paso had breached its labor agreements under the Labor-Management Relations Act and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

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