labour law

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labour law

the body of legislation and judicial decisions concerned with INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, TRADE UNIONS and employment. Labour law has two main forms:
  1. individual labour law, relating to the rights and obligations of individual employees.

    From the 1960s onwards the volume of law in this area has grown considerably, partly as a response to European Union legislation. The Employment Act 1975 was particularly important as it established the right not to be unfairly dismissed (see UNFAIR DISMISSAL). Other important legislation in this era proscribed DISCRIMINATION on grounds of race or sex. In the 1980s individual rights were weakened somewhat. For example, the qualifying period for the right not to be unfairly dismissed was extended. However, legislation by the European Union counterbalanced this trend to some extent, and in the 1990s employees' rights in the areas of dismissal, MATERNITY RIGHTS, PARENTAL LEAVE and WORKING TIME were widened and strengthened;

  2. collective labour laws, relating to the activities of TRADE UNIONS and the conduct of INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS and COLLECTIVE BARGAINING. Traditionally, the law has not played an important role in industrial relations, and agreements made between unions and employers are not legally binding (see VOLUNTARISM). However, industrial relations has become increasingly subject to legal intervention in recent years (see JURIDIFICATION). In the 1970s a statutory union recognition procedure was established (subsequently repealed) by the Employment Act 1975. This law also required that employers consult over REDUNDANCIES and pass to unions information relevant to collective bargaining (see DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION). In the 1980s and 1990s the conduct of STRIKES, TRADE UNION IMMUNITIES, SECONDARY ACTION, and the CLOSED SHOP were all the subjects of legislation, much of it aimed at eradicating what the government saw as trade union abuses. Recently a new STATUTORY UNION RECOGNITION PROCEDURE was introduced. Whilst union action continues to be highly regulated, labour law is now seen to be less hostile to unions than it was in the 1980s and 1990s. See MINIMUM WAGE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the ministry also deported 318 labor law violators after coordinating with their respective embassies.
Many of these changes require that every employer prominently display a labor law poster advising employees of their rights under the new law.
In his word delivered during the "New Labor Law Orientations" conference held at the USJ, Faculty of Law, Harb said the newly adopted law the Ministry elaborated, covers several features.
was injured in an accident that was not proximately caused by a violation of Labor Law [section] 240(1).
But as the reaction to the labor law demonstrated, many of the French like things as they are, even if the nation's long-term economic health is at risk.
For more than a century, New York's "Scaffold Law", now known as Labor Law Section 240(1), has provided for strict liability against owners, contractors and their agents with respect to construction workers who sustain elevation-related accidents.
LANCASTER - Updates on labor law and paid family leave insurance will be presented at a seminar to be held 7 a.
The labor law is pretty clear that anyone, regardless of legal status, has the same rights in the workplace," he says.
BNA said the title is designed to keep employment and labor law generalists, including corporate counsel and employment attorneys, current with information on significant federal and and state court rulings, regulatory actions, and administrative rulings affecting the workplace.
The Essentials package is a new, jargon-free labor law system to guide you step-by-step through California labor law compliance.
While many reasons have been advanced for the long-term decline--such as global competition, improved human resource management techniques, unresponsive unions, and the increase in legislation protecting individuals--trade unionists and many neutral observers believe that the evolution of labor law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is a major contributor.
The DOL nursing home audit also disclosed Child Labor Law violations.