National Labor Relations Board

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National Labor Relations Board

Also called the NLRB. An agency of the U.S. federal government that monitors union elections and guards against unfair labor practices such as featherbedding or employer discrimination against union members. It also serves as an administrative court for labor disputes. The NLRB consists of five members, appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to a five-year term. It was established by executive order in 1934.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the National Labor Relations Act needs to be changed, the current incarnation of the card check bill is not the way to do it.
As noted in the United Fresh Produce article, the Employee Free Choice Actamends the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), and agricultural laborers are exempt from that Act.
The court grappled with a tension in the Labor Relations Act that excludes supervisory personnel from unions but includes professionals such as professional health care workers.
Much of the credit for this postwar social contract should go to the National Labor Relations Act of 1935.
The National Labor Relations Act has been cited as responsible for the current disadvantaged position unions experience in industrial relations, and there are calls for its amendment.
A series of new decisions issued by the National Labor Relations Board enforcing an outdated section of the National Labor Relations Act makes it illegal for nonunion employees to share decision making with management.
Some have ruled that the time limit should be borrowed from State law; others have looked to an analogous Federal law, the National Labor Relations Act,(2) for an applicable period of limitation.
The 1935 National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), also known as the Wagner Act, made such firings illegal, and the law hasn't changed.
In legal terms, the National Labor Relations Act (1988) does define professional employee quite precisely, and specifically notes the character of the work and the education required for such a position:
The NLRB issued a Final Rule in August with a poster requirement requiring most private employers to notify employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act by Nov.
Under its ruling, the NLRB did not determine if the college players were statutory employees under the National Labor Relations Act.
alleging that the company committed wide-ranging and serious violations of the Agricultural Labor Relations Act that undermined the rights of Gerawan's employees and the union that represents them.