National Labor Relations Board

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National Labor Relations Board

Also called the NLRB. An agency of the U.S. federal government that monitors union elections and guards against unfair labor practices such as featherbedding or employer discrimination against union members. It also serves as an administrative court for labor disputes. The NLRB consists of five members, appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to a five-year term. It was established by executive order in 1934.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in Pennsylvania, the courts have ruled that mushroom workers are covered by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Act (PLRA).
The frequent strikes for the purpose of gaining bargaining rights led nearly forty states to individually adopt public sector collective bargaining legislation, thus paralleling the enactment of the National Labor Relations Act in 1935.
The National Labor Relations Act guarantees employers freedom of speech, within limits, and supervisors must be trained in exercising that right through effective communication with employees.
He said previous court decisions have established that federal and state regulators were prohibited from setting their own standards for conduct that is regulated by the National Labor Relations Act.
The employer objected claiming that, under the National Labor Relations Act, the six registered nurses employed at Caney Creek were supervisors and not eligible to be included in a collective bargaining unit.
concerned a group of registered nurses who had tried to exercise their right, under the National Labor Relations Act, to form a union.
The lawsuit is based on the National Labor Relations Act, which says that the state may not take sides in a labor dispute," explains Chernoff.
How to Take a Case Before the NLRB gives attorneys complete reference to current requirements for conducting elections, handling claims of unfair labor practices, seeking fee reimbursement, acquiring NLRB records, and meeting other requirements under the National Labor Relations Act.
In most circumstances, the PEO also contractually assumes responsibility for compliance with the regulations of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Title VII, the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, COBRA, ERISA, the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family Medical & Leave Act (FMLA) and the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA).
While many reasons have been advanced for the long-term decline--such as global competition, improved human resource management techniques, unresponsive unions, and the increase in legislation protecting individuals--trade unionists and many neutral observers believe that the evolution of labor law under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is a major contributor.
From the sound and fury surrounding its passage, one would have thought that enactment of the first family-leave legislation in 1993 portended the biggest change in our economy since the National Labor Relations Act.
Much of the credit for this postwar social contract should go to the National Labor Relations Act of 1935.