Curb Trading

(redirected from Kerb Trading)

Curb Trading

The act or practice of trading outside an exchange's regulation. Generally speaking, curb trading occurs online or over a telephone. It is a form of over-the-counter trading. It should not be confused with a trading curb.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the close of kerb trading last Friday, tin was the only major contract quoted on the London metal exchange not to be showing a loss over the trading week.
Demand for dollar surged in kerb trading pulling the rupee down to the new lows.
In kerb trading, the dollar has remained under pressure since September 11 last year.
The next two days produced almost identical daily ranges between $1398 and $1417 before closing at $1405 on Friday's kerb trading for a $34 gain over the period.
Individual trading patterns varied but one factor common to all was that by the close of kerb trading on Friday, all contracts were someway off their best for the week.
Trading on the London Metal Exchange last week was generally range-bound with a downward bias, although both copper and aluminium contracts had managed marginal gains by the close of kerb trading.
Further ground was lost during kerb trading with $1,688 being hit before trading ceased at $1,690 for an overall loss over the week of $87 a tonne.
From what was to be the high for the week of $1,718 last Monday, the forward price fell daily until reaching the closing low of $1,640 during kerb trading on Friday.
As was the case with the other metals, copper peaked on Thursday at $1732 per tonne and then closed during kerb trading on Friday at $1714 for a $4 per tonne gain over the week.
As is often the case, the London Metal Exchange traded under the general influence of the copper market last week with all contracts recording net losses by the close of kerb trading on Friday.
By the close of kerb trading last Thursday, prices covering all metals were off their lows but still below the values of the previous Friday.
Opening at $1,212 on Thursday, the market had moved ahead to clear the $1,220 level by lunchtime but then held steady until the afternoon kerb trading, when aggressive buying attributed to major fund shortcovering saw the forward price surge to a close on the high at $1,227.