Kebeles

Kebeles

In Ethiopia, a political subdivision approximately equivalent to a neighborhood within a city.
References in periodicals archive ?
Organize 980 radio listening groups from 49 kebeles (communities)
The group composed of 7-9 members from elders, kebeles (sub-district) cabinet, farmer, trader, religious leader, health extension worker and agriculture development agent.
New construction aims to boost the main road network to 64,500 km and to add 71,500 km of all-weather roads connecting all the country's rural kebeles (18,000 neighbourhood administrations).
In each of the three cities, two kebeles (the smallest administrative unit in Ethiopia) were selected.
Formal institutions like cooperatives and kebeles are the most popular vehicles for delivering development assistance (such as extension services, distribution of seeds and fertilizers, credit, and training).
These ex-post baseline assessment will cover 22 kebeles around the dam of Gilgel Gibe 1, which are found in 4 districts in Jimma zone, Oromia Regional state.
Preliminary selection of edible plant parts from five kebeles (lowest administrative structure in Ethiopia) in each district was undertaken using focus group discussion (FGD) where participants were requested to list down ten most preferred and most consumed species of wild and semi-wild origin used by the community as GLVs, three used as fruits and three used as other.
The Amhara proclamation now permits land to be assigned to adults who have not established independent households but leaves the determination of eligibility to kebeles.
Given the high illiteracy rates, this program should be administered at various levels--through women's associations, public media (whose coverage is low), schools, health clinics, kebeles, and innovative means such as street plays and other forms of entertainment.
The number of home and development agents is small relative to the size of the kebeles (for example, there is only one each to cover 16 villages; some time ago an attempt was made to promote vegetable growing among women, but the project was discontinued, mainly because the villages were too far apart and too far from town, and the agents had no means of transport).
In some regions, for example Oromiya, the kebeles or village-level entities, form the link with grassroots organizations and ensure their participation in development planning.