Justice

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Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three short chief justiceships of Taschereau, Cartwright and Fauteux are combined for convenience into a single composite chief justiceship.
This paper will examine the practice of separate concurrence in the modern Supreme Court of Canada, which I will take as including the Chief Justiceships of Dickson, Lamer, and McLachlin.
htm (reviewing Broderick's dramatic career, ranging from his participation in former President Clinton's 1992 campaign, to an investigation into his alleged involvement in judicial misconduct, to a bizarre in-home attack that left him unrecognizable); Justices Criticized for E-mail on Ballot Issue, supra note 25 (reporting the controversy that erupted as a result of the court speaking out against a proposed constitutional amendment); Ramer, supra note 3 (reporting that the statute under which Broderick succeeded to his chief justiceship was ruled unconstitutional).
One distinctive feature of the new chief justiceship suggests the possibility of a different pattern from that of the Lamer Court.
Jackson later made an open attack on his Alabama colleague, Hugo Black, in 1946, at a time when Jackson might well have been boosted to the chief justiceship.
Rutledge, `Edward Butler and the Chief Justiceship,' Historical Studies, No.
Johnson, The Chief Justiceship of John Marshall, 1801-1835.
Parrish (ABA-CLIO 2002); The Chief Justiceship of Charles Evans Hughes, 1930-1941, William G.
concurrence dropped precipitously during his Chief Justiceship.
He transformed the office of the chief justiceship.
Bush between them filled five seats on the current Court with conservative appointees, including Antonin Scalia, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, and Clarence Thomas, as well as elevating Rehnquist to the chief justiceship in 1986.