Justice


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Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in classic literature ?
If any handsome woman come to seek justice of thee, turn away thine eyes from her tears and thine ears from her lamentations, and consider deliberately the merits of her demand, if thou wouldst not have thy reason swept away by her weeping, and thy rectitude by her sighs.
That your friends will be driven into exile and deprived of citizenship, or will lose their property, is tolerably certain; and you yourself, if you fly to one of the neighbouring cities, as, for example, Thebes or Megara, both of which are well governed, will come to them as an enemy, Socrates, and their government will be against you, and all patriotic citizens will cast an evil eye upon you as a subverter of the laws, and you will confirm in the minds of the judges the justice of their own condemnation of you.
That inflexible and uniform adherence to the rights of the Constitution, and of individuals, which we perceive to be indispensable in the courts of justice, can certainly not be expected from judges who hold their offices by a temporary commission.
Her constitution declares, "that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments shall be separate and distinct; so that neither exercise the powers properly belonging to the other; nor shall any person exercise the powers of more than one of them at the same time, except that the justices of county courts shall be eligible to either House of Assembly.
For if we should say that justice admitted of variation of degree, difficulties might ensue, and this is true with regard to all those qualities which are dispositions.
Within that edifice he had dispensed justice to the people in the days when his name was never mentioned without honor.
This part of the story has brought us to the fourth act of the play, and when the curtain rises on this act we see the Court of Justice in Venice.
MENO: Yes, Socrates; I agree there; for justice is virtue.
The argument of the Republic is the search after Justice, the nature of which is first hinted at by Cephalus, the just and blameless old man-- then discussed on the basis of proverbial morality by Socrates and Polemarchus--then caricatured by Thrasymachus and partially explained by Socrates--reduced to an abstraction by Glaucon and Adeimantus, and having become invisible in the individual reappears at length in the ideal State which is constructed by Socrates.
Every person made some malicious comment or other on the occasion, and reflected on the partiality of the justice.
Tell me: where find we justice, which is love with seeing eyes?
How is it that you, living constantly in the country, are not a justice of the peace?