John Maynard Keynes


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John Maynard Keynes

A major British economist. He provided much of the intellectual foundation for the theory that government intervention is necessary to ensure an active and vibrant economy. According to this theory, government should stimulate demand for goods and services in order to encourage economic growth. It thus recommends tax cuts and increased government spending during recessions to reinvigorate growth; likewise, it recommends tax increases and spending cuts during economic expansion in order to combat inflation. His thought was extremely popular for much of the 20th century prior to the 1970s, when stagflation (which under Keynesian theory should not be possible) was prevalent in the UK and the US. However, Keynesianism resurged at the end of the first decade of the 2000s. Keynes lived from 1883 to 1946.
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5 and 6 of The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes.
Rising above the fray is the serenely mischievous John Maynard Keynes, the council's first chair, who described the evolution of its famous "arm's length" funding principle as having "happened in a very English, informal, unostentatious way-half-baked if you like.
John Maynard Keynes, The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money.
Forster, economist John Maynard Keynes, biographer Lytton Strachey and art critic Clive Bell.
According to Krugman, a professor of economics whom Fortune has dubbed the most literate economist since John Maynard Keynes, the string of financial crises that have marked the end of the 20th century are following the same threatening pattern that led to the Great Depression of the 1930s.
It was time for some new thinking; this was provided by a British economist called John Maynard Keynes.
John Maynard Keynes, the economist who helped point the way out of the Great Depression, noted: "Let goods be homespun wherever it is reasonable and conveniently possible and, above all, let finance be primarily national.
More important, Kavanagh gives us a view of the intellectual and creative cauldron that was bubbling at the time of the birth of the Vic-Wells (later Sadler's Wells and, finally, Royal) Ballet: We meet Marie Rambert, Lord (Gerald) Berners, Constant Lambert, Benjamin Britten, Cecil Beaton, the Sitwells, Gertrude Stein, Virgil Thomson, Margot Fonteyn (who carried on a long affair with Lambert in her early twenties), Oliver Messel, John Gielgud, Lydia Lopokova, John Maynard Keynes, and numerous others.
Rummaging widely across many disciplines, he drew inspiration from Van Wyck Brooks, Thorstein Veblen, John Dewey, Frederick Jackson Turner, Charles Beard, John Maynard Keynes, R.
One of the most influential and unexpected economic luminaries of his time and the original value investor, John Maynard Keynes was a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on many governments' fiscal policies.
Under the plan investment in the economy through public works is the way to stimulate the economy and combat recession as envisaged by the founder of Keynesianism, John Maynard Keynes.
The battle of Bretton Woods; John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the making of a new world order.