ghetto

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ghetto

A term with its origins in eastern Europe, used to designate the part of town occupied by Jewish citizens. Now the term ghetto is used to describe any urban area suffering significant deterioration, often predominated by one or a very few ethnic or racial groups. Disputes often arise regarding whether lenders, insurers, and other service providers are engaged in illegal discrimination when they redline these neighborhoods, or whether they are assessing risks based on the quality of the infrastructure and not on any judgments regarding the inhabitants.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the rest of the group proceeded to the Forum, I spent over thirty minutes asking Martin questions and listening to his stories of life in the Jewish Ghetto.
Mary's Academy in Inglewood, escaped from a Jewish ghetto that was about to be wiped out by the Nazis by hiding underneath his mother's skirt.
Hunger for the printed word: Books and libraries in the Jewish ghettos of Nazi-occupied Europe.
Holocaust City: The Making of a Jewish Ghetto, by Tim Cole.
Seventeen-year-old Duddy Kravitz wants out of the Montreal Jewish ghetto in which he was raised and he has taken seriously his grandfather's motto, "a man without land is a nobody.
The way the barriers were arranged for that sad farce of a security check, was just a modern replacement of a gate to a 19th century Jewish Ghetto," remarked one ageing European passenger.
These poems were mainly about history, memories of his family (especially his mother), life in the Jewish ghetto, eros, and his personal feelings toward Poland.
He ran away from his home in the Jewish ghetto at i6 to go to Baghdad, then a commercial center, was robbed down to his underwear in the frozen winter, returned home humiliated, and ran away again.
Kenneth Stow, after studying some six thousand notarial documents (Notai ebrei) of the sixteenth-century Roman Jewish ghetto, and publishing or summarizing many of those in a separate work, has attempted here to synthesize his findings into a picture of the Jews' identity-preservation strategies in Rome.
Over the next four decades, I got to know and respect the bar mitzvah boy born Yitzrock Loiza Grossberg in a Jewish ghetto in the Bronx (he changed his name to Larry Rivers, probably inspired by Muddy Waters, to pursue a career as a jazz saxophonist).
A VISITOR TO THE JEWISH GHETTO OF VENICE WILL notice two markers--signs that confirm its identity.
That evening the professor came home in the usual way, by train from Modena to Bologna, then by bicycle to his house, less than a mile from the station in the city's former Jewish ghetto.
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