Jefferson Nickel


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Jefferson Nickel

A coin minted by the United States starting in 1938. It is worth 1/20 of one dollar. It features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse.
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It disappeared from the five-cent coin in 1883, and did not reappear until production of the Jefferson nickel in 1938.
The nickel, which became known as the Jefferson Nickel, split in two and out came a tiny piece of film containing a set of numbers too small to read.
The Jefferson nickel has been around since 1938, but a redesign of the five-cent coin features a more realistic portrait of the third President.
Both the Jefferson nickel and Buffalo nickel designs are entirely indigenous, with only the barest nod to another culture in the motto E Pluribus Unum (from many--one).
Coin Values features the newly issued coin on its cover and also provides a peak at the second new 2004 tails design for the Jefferson nickel, which is expected to enter circulation in August.
The June issue also contains helpful information on how to identify a design element on the older Jefferson nickel that can more than double the coin's value to collectors.
From the Lincoln cent in 1909, through the Jefferson nickel in 1938, Roosevelt dime in 1946, Washington quarter in 1932, Kennedy half in 1964 (after a brief interlude for Ben Franklin, 1948-1963), and the Eisenhower dollar in 1971, America deified its favored sons.
It also contains proof versions of the Lincoln penny, the Jefferson nickel, the Roosevelt dime, the Kennedy half-dollar and the Golden Dollar featuring Sacagawea.
To commemorate its significance, the United States Mint will publicly release the new Jefferson nickel, the first in the Westward Journey Nickel Series, in St.
A Guide Book of Buffalo and Jefferson Nickels is the eighth entry in the Bowers Series of numismatic references: while general-interest holdings might find it too specialized a reference, any library strong in coin collecting must have this.
The Jefferson nickels would stay in circulation, just as the old wheat pennies do now.
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