James Goodfellow


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James Goodfellow

A Scottish inventor who patented personal identification number technology and was also instrumental in developing the automated teller machine. He was born in 1937.
References in periodicals archive ?
Artist Shaun Devenney took advantage of the recent dry weather to paint the huge mural of his neighbour, James Goodfellow OBE, on the side of the Spar shop in Rowan Street, Hunterhill.
Paisley man James Goodfellow, 80, patented the concept for card-operated ATMs in 1966.
28The idea of a PIN stored on the card was developed by British engineer James Goodfellow in 1965.
James Goodfellow, 79, was a young engineer working in Glasgow in the 1960s when the banks were looking for a way of letting customers get hold of their money after branches closed on a Saturday.
James Goodfellow, 54, of Avonmere, Rugby, admitted speeding on the M1 motorway.
Gail Cohen will assume the role of chair of the board of directors from James Goodfellow.
Protectionist will be able to do with this five-franc piece for the encouragement of domestic industry, James Goodfellow could also have done.
The older boys were sent to Scotland to live with their grandmother and Ricky was sent to live with James Goodfellow who was his Great Uncle.
An OBE also goes to James Goodfellow, the British engineer who developed the idea of a personal identification number (PIN) used for retrieving money from 'holes in the wall'.
James Goodfellow brought 12 years of experience as a store manager for Tesco when he joined the 101,000 sq ft Phoenix Way store three-months before it opened on November 1.
Shaun Devenney was stunned to learn he lived next to James Goodfellow OBE, the Paisley man credited with inventing the personal identification number (PIN).
The concept was invented by Scot James Goodfellow - but the version used by Barclays was created by another engineer, John Shepherd-Barron.