James Goodfellow


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James Goodfellow

A Scottish inventor who patented personal identification number technology and was also instrumental in developing the automated teller machine. He was born in 1937.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protectionist will be able to do with this five-franc piece for the encouragement of domestic industry, James Goodfellow could also have done.
The older boys were sent to Scotland to live with their grandmother and Ricky was sent to live with James Goodfellow who was his Great Uncle.
Johnny Bean was leading points scorer, and Sean Fereday and James Goodfellow joint top try scorers.
The list also includes James Goodfellow, who invented the PIN number and child abuse crusader Sandra Brown who both get an OBE.
An OBE also goes to James Goodfellow, the British engineer who developed the idea of a personal identification number (PIN) used for retrieving money from 'holes in the wall'.
James Goodfellow brought 12 years of experience as a store manager for Tesco when he joined the 101,000 sq ft Phoenix Way store three-months before it opened on November 1.
THERE is something of a biblical parable about the differences between Scots tycoon Jim McColl and ATM inventor James Goodfellow.
An OBE also goes to James Goodfellow, who developed the PIN number for credit and debit cards.
This along with the innovative management of Paul Fletcher's (Coventry Arena Company, chief executive), team in endorsing the Arena Core Group's mantra, "local jobs for local people" has meant that the First of the recruitments on site by Tesco, managed by James Goodfellow, resulted in approximately 50 per cent of the staff taken on being from Foleshill, Holbrooks and Longford, the area immediately surrounding the Arena site.
James Goodfellow, 74, created the ATM and patented PIN technology to make it work in 1966.
Tesco store manager James Goodfellow said they were proud to be supporting such a good cause.
Another Scottish inventor, James Goodfellow, had patented a similar machine in 1966, but his version for Westminster Bank wasn't unveiled until a month after Shepherd-Barron's.