Joachimsthal

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Joachimsthal

A 16th-century name for Jachymov, a town in what is now the Czech Republic that was known for its silver deposits. Coins minted from silver found in Joachimsthal became common throughout the Holy Roman Empire and elsewhere. This coin was called the Joachimsthaler, which was shortened to thaler. This in turn became the origin for the word "dollar."
References in periodicals archive ?
Number of Location minerals * 1 Poudrette Quarry, Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada 78 2 Kukisvumchorr Mt" Khibiny Massif, Kola Peninsula, 45 Russia 3 Jachymov, Karlovy Vary Region, Bohemia, Czech 38 Republic 4 Clara Mine, Wolfach, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany 37 5 Tsumeb Mine, Tsumeb, Namibia 29 6 Vuoriyarvi Massif, Northern Karelia, Russia 25 7 Sounion Mine No.
The story began in Jachymov (Joachimsthal), a town in West Bohemia near the German border, where, circa 1530, one Isaak Hassler was born.
Starting in the late Middle Ages, pitchblende was extracted from the Habsburg silver mines in Joachimsthal, Bohemia (now Jachymov in the Czech Republic), and was used as a coloring agent in the local glassmaking industry.
Algunos de ellos tan significativos como Rammelsberg, Jachymov, Bleiberg e Idria.
In general, presa germana atribuie o deosebita importanta politica vizitei la Paris a domnului ministru de Externe Mitilineu, urmata indata dupa conferinta Micii Antante de la Jachymov si tocmai in timpul cand Anglia era hotarata a rupe relatiunilor cu Rusia Sovietica.
The MARJ station is in the IRSM building in Marianska, which is part of the town of Jachymov (Fig.
Samples compared include the stibioclaudetite fragment from our X-ray study; claudetite from Jachymov, Czech Republic (University of Arizona Mineral Museum 16128; RRUFF R050313); and leiteite from Tsumeb, Namibia (RRUFF R040011).
The most notable occurrences worldwide of the five-element-type vein system are Kongsberg in Norway (Bugge 1978; Johnsen 1986), Jachymov in the Czech Republic (Ondrus et al.
Many of the younger priests and religious were sent to military labor units; others were sent to work in the uranium mines in Jachymov in northern Czechoslovakia.