Ivan F. Boesky

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Ivan F. Boesky

An American investor known for insider trading in the mid-1980s. An arbitrageur, he received tips from colleagues and made major stock purchases in publicly traded companies a few days before mergers or acquisitions were announced. He accumulated $200 million, but paid much of it in fines after he was caught. He later served time in jail.
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He led the SECs crackdown on market abuses that resulted in the successful prosecutions of Ivan Boesky, Michael Milken and Drexel Burnham, among others.
SAID to have inspired the character of Gordon Gekko, the corporate raider played by Michael Douglas in 1987 film Wall Street, Ivan Boesky had a meteoric rise and a sudden fall.
Wall Street speculator Ivan Boesky, the main witness against Drexel, went to prison after settling insider trading charges, but no officers from Drexel served jail time.
Not even Ivan Boesky and Gordon Gekko could have imagined merger mania on such a frenzied, global scale as the one we live in real time on Wall Street.
When I first read it (the pilot), I thought of (stock trader) Ivan Boesky, I thought of the corporate raiders and that kind of spirit of '80s excess: 'More money, more sex, faster, harder, give it to me,' '' said the actor, whose credits include Thranduil in "The Hobbit'' film franchise, "Lincoln'' and TV's "Pushing Daisies.
In 1984, investment banker Ivan Boesky hired lobbyists to attend committee hearings about a big oil merger and report back to him.
For good measure, throw in cameos by the likes of Bernie Madoff, Michael Milken and Ivan Boesky.
But there were concerns as well: The Ivan Boesky insider-trading scandal and the troubles encountered by the high-flying investment bank Drexel Burnham Lambert dampened the general public's confidence in the trustworthiness of the markets.
There is also the unforgettable Ivan Boesky, king of risk arbitrage.
Past insider-trading prosecutions of people other than occasional traders usually involved rogue financiers, like Ivan Boesky in the 1980's.
High profile cases of inside traders like Ivan Boesky and Dennis Levine made targets of federal prosecutions household names and the faces of a new generation of robber barons.
Howard Hunt, who helped engineer the first Watergate burglary; and Wall Street titan Ivan Boesky, who engaged in illegal insider trading.