Jihad

(redirected from Islam)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Islam: Muhammad, Five Pillars of Islam

Jihad

A religious obligation for Muslims. The word is Arabic for "struggle," though its technical meaning has been disputed. Historically, many scholars have argued that jihad primarily entails a struggle against one's base instincts. However, it was used both in the Quran and by rulers of some Muslim-majority countries to justify war, whether to end persecution of Muslims or to provide religious grounds for conquest. The meaning of the term remains controversial, though some groups, notably al-Qaida, emphasize its militant element.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book's theme is that extremists in several religions - not only Islam - threaten women's rights around the world.
If people think Islam is such a wonderful religion, just go to Saudi Arabia and make it your home.
Mujahid sat down recently with The Chicago Reporter to discuss Radio Islam.
The problem with that, he says, was that people melded their cultural traditions with their practice of Islam.
In her art, you can't see what you see as you see it because Islam is in your path, slanting the view of whatever it might be--unloved crockery, discredited architectural ideals, a girl's face--while knowing that she can make you care enough to miss it when, as always, it goes away.
Given the single source of funding for religion and science programs, given the checkered history of the past attempts at internationalization of the discourse, and given the slow withdrawal of almost all recognized Muslim scholars in the field of Islam and science from events funded by the John Templeton Foundation as well as their dissociation from organizations established by the Foundation, what future can we envision for any genuine inter-faith dialogue in the realm of religion and science?
Yet as Bulliet writes, over the longer reach of history, Islam and the West have been far more culturally integrated than most people realized; there is a far better case for "Islamo-Christian civilization" than there is for the clash of civilizations.
THE RELATIONSHIP between religion and culture is an ongoing tension in these women's lives, as it is in the many debates about the nature of contemporary Islam.
When Nasr Abu Zayd came to the Netherlands some ten years ago, he hoped that in the free and tolerant climate of Europe a modern and liberal Islam would develop.
He posits that this historical struggle should be recalled in analyzing the present day conflict within Islam.
If you start blaming Islam for the mistakes of religious leaders, this will do nothing but serve the interests of opportunists.
The state prosecution authority ordered the detention of Islamist preacher and TV anchor Abu Islam on Sunday, in order to investigate him on charges of contempt of Christianity.