International Law

(redirected from International public law)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to International public law: International private law

International Law

The area of law dealing with relations between countries. International law consists of many aspects, both written and unwritten, but often refers to matters of war and peace, respect for human rights, international trade and commerce, and similar things. Institutions like the United Nations and the International Criminal Court purport to enforce international law, though their effectiveness is limited by the cooperation given by member states. In general, international law is governed by treaties between sovereign states.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike international public law, private sports law knows no boundaries.
It should make us uneasy about the relationship between domestic and international public law and about the notions of sovereignty on which they depend.
These relations are regulated by norms of International Public Law.
This recognises particular achievements in the following fields: defending human rights and fundamental freedoms (in particular the freedom of opinion and expression), protection of minority rights, respect for international public law, development of democracy and the implementation of the rule of law.
Courses on international public law have been disappearing from the undergraduate curriculum for four decades.
Every student of international public law knows that already in the Middle Ages there was a very sophisticated body of discussion and jurisdiction in this field.
The Relationship of German National Law with International Public Law and with European Community Law.
In 2004 the International Court of Justice (ICJ) delivered an opinion in which it unequivocally stated that the route of the Wall (AKA 'the Separation Wall', AKA 'the Security Fence', 'AKA 'the Security Barrier', AKA 'the Apartheid Wall') violated international public law.

Financial browser ?
Full browser ?