Interest deduction

Interest deduction

An interest expense, such as interest on a margin account, that is allowed as a deduction for tax purposes.

Interest Deduction

A reduction in one's taxable income that comes from expense from certain interest payments. For example, the interest one pays on one's mortgage is tax deductible so as to encourage home ownership. Likewise, interest paid on a margin account is often deductible. The United States government uses interest deductions, among other statutory tax advantages, to encourage behavior it supports without mandating it.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a bigger impact when the limitation of interest deduction is based on EBIT at 30%.
Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) introduced an amendment to the Republican tax plan to recommit the bill back to the Finance Committee in order to permanently secure tax cuts for middle-class, working people, and small businesses and to keep the medical expense deduction, the student loan interest deduction, the retirement savings incentives, the homeownership incentives and the historic tax credit.
Although the wealthiest taxpayers, with the largest mortgages, get the largest share of the interest deduction money, a significant portion of less wealthy taxpayers also benefit from it.
Thus, the ITAT allowed the interest deduction claim made by the father during financial year 2008-09.
Maximum interest deduction Deduction phase-out based on modified AGI $2,500
The Tax Court held that the taxpayers were not entitled to take an investment interest deduction for any of the mortgage interest they paid on property they had purchased because they failed to substantiate their claimed allocation of the mortgage debt.
2) Should the mortgage interest deduction on a second residence continue beyond 2012?
The mortgage interest deduction allows homeowners to deduct their mortgage interest payments from their tax returns, limited to up to $1 million of a mortgage's value.
As Congress continues to debate federal budgetary and tax policy in an atmosphere of debt ceilings and ratings downgrades, the time has come for the mortgage interest deduction to go.
All it will take is a single vote by a lone senator or House member who breaks with his or her party to put the mortgage interest deduction into serious play.
She can't claim the interest deduction because she isn't making the payments, and you can't deduct them because you're not legally obligated for the loan payments.
Recent federal government budget proposals suggest that the mortgage interest deduction should be reduced for homeowners in specific tax brackets.