Aggregate Limit

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Aggregate Limit

The maximum amount that an insurance policy will provide over a given period of time or over the life of the policy. For example, if an insurance company has agreed to pay all of a person's medical bills up to $100,000 and the person incurs $135,000 in services, the policyholder must pay $35,000 out of pocket. Some supplemental insurance policies provide coverage over the aggregate limit. See also: Stop loss insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
He is not a big fan of the current plan, which raised the deposit insurance limit to $250,000, for one year.
consulting firm Secura Group LLC, a LECG company, argues that increasing the deposit insurance limit is unfair to small banks because they will disproportionately pay for the new insurance system.
Another relevant factor that should be considered in evaluating the $100,000 insurance limit is the distribution of deposit holders by size of account.
An example of one such approach is depositor coinsurance or a deductible under which a depositor at a failed institution receives most, but not all, of his or her deposit in excess of a reduced (or the current) insurance limit.
Global Banking News-January 20, 2016--Azerbaijan to increase insurance limit on bank deposits
Premier has been working in partnership with all of its insurers to set its insurance limits at realistic levels.
Most contracting parties include "minimum" insurance limits that must be carried while the contract remains in effect.
finds that companies reduced their liability insurance limits by an average of 6 percent in 2002.
The contract should require evidence that the contractor carries liability insurance and workers' compensation insurance at least equal to the primary liability insurance limits the camp carries.
J&H Marsh & McLennan's annual study of liability insurance limits is now available to FEI members at no charge.
6, the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th District upheld a decision by the District Court for the District of Maryland that policies bought by Wallace & Gale after installations were complete do not subject the insurers to unlimited amounts of liability, but rather to the aggregate insurance limits defined by the contracts.

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