Bankruptcy risk

(redirected from Insolvency Risks)

Bankruptcy risk

The risk that a firm will be unable to meet its debt obligations. Also referred to as default or insolvency risk.

Bankruptcy Risk

The risk that an individual or especially a company may be unable to service its debts. Bankruptcy risk is greater when the individual or firm has little or no cash flow, or when it manages its assets poorly. Banks assess bankruptcy risk when considering whether to make a loan. It is also called insolvency risk.
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Restaurants tend to have one of the highest insolvency risks of the sectors tracked.
The transport and haulage sector in the North East also fared well, recording the lowest rate of insolvency risks in any of the UK's 12 regions for the sixth consecutive month.
NORTH East hotel businesses are facing a rise in insolvency risk, a new survey suggests.
Moreover, payment delays are common and insolvency risks remain high, both negatively impacting cash flow.
highly successful at containing insolvency risks in the
Following which, the solicitor can advise the lender of any insolvency risks of lending money.
Our results indicate that the managerial decision to purchase property insurance is positively related to company size and insolvency risks.
These tests suggest that large companies with higher insolvency risks appear to have a greater tendency to buy property insurance than do their small counterparts with lower insolvency risk.
Through a comprehensive range of insurance, financing and credit-management products, the SACE Group can guarantee more stable cash flows, thereby transforming counterpart insolvency risks into development opportunities.
Despite this, payment delays are common with almost 1/3 of invoice value extending past due and insolvency risks remain high; Both negatively impacting cash flow.
The rating reflects the credit quality of the underlying receivables, the capability of the Dragados group of companies as originator and servicer, as well as the credit support that dynamically adjusts on a monthly basis to provide for a stressed level of historical portfolio losses, dilutions, transaction carrying costs, and commingling and other originators' insolvency risks.