Insiders


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Insiders

Traditionally referring to the directors, senior officers and holders of more than 10% of the voting shares of the company, insiders now include anyone who possesses or has access to material, non-public information (inside information), including tippees. This could include, for example, even a junior employee who makes photocopies for a board meeting, or someone who is ‘tipped’ by an insider..

Insider

A person who has knowledge of or access to restricted or otherwise nonpublic information about a publicly-traded company. Examples include senior management and shareholders with more than a 10% stake in the company. Under most circumstances, it is a crime for an insider to make trades on the special information he/she possesses. See also: Inside information, Insider trading.
References in periodicals archive ?
Insiders have exclusive access to key business tools, including benchmarking data, loan advisory services and online courses.
in November; consensus buying among insiders is a (http://www.
The prospect of insider trading gives corporate insiders a reason to manipulate stock prices, creating short-term gains in corporate profits that will allow insiders to sell their own stock at a large profit but harm the firm, other shareholders, and the public in the long term.
Therefore, it does not necessarily follow that we should come down with "hobnail boots" on insiders, to use the expression that John Shad used when he took office in 1981 (Henry, 1986, quoting SEC chairman John Shad).
M also adopted an insider trading compliance program under which insiders could trade M shares only between November 5 and November 30 of that year (trading window).
Probably the most surprising finding is that true inside information--the kind that tends to get insiders into trouble with the SEC--plays at most a minor role in the insider trading decisions of top executives.
McMenamin can't imagine any economic harm resulting from insider trading; he even questions the validity of insider trading laws, a subject that could be interesting and provocative if written by a less biased person.
Yes, the Insiders possess immense power and wealth.
The changes increased the risk that CPAs and their firms might inadvertently violate laws prohibiting insider trading unless they have careful procedures in place to avoid that possibility.
Insiders should count on nothing unless the company has a tradition of weighting the scales for current employees.
The people are out forming secession movements, while the insiders are treating the people's property as though it belonged to them.
Learn to interpret stock sales made by company insiders