Inductive reasoning


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Related to Inductive reasoning: Abductive reasoning

Inductive reasoning

The attempt to use information about a specific situation to draw a conclusion.

Inductive Reasoning

A way of forming reasonable conclusions by gathering evidence and then forming principles based upon them. For example, if one wishes to find out how a stock will perform, one gathers as much evidence on that stock as possible and makes a conclusion based on that, regardless of one's feelings or suppositions beforehand. The advantage of inductive reasoning is that its evidence offers applicability to "real world" scenarios; however, a disadvantage is that one's evidence may be inaccurate or anecdotal. It is sometimes difficult to know how much evidence is needed to justify coming to a general conclusion. See also: Deductive reasoning, Analogy.
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Solving a difficult and complex investigation with keen inductive reasoning demands more than a team of dedicated personnel; it requires a leader.
The above literature review leads to the hypothesis that the total critical thinking score and its components such as inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, evaluation, analysis, and inference are affected by college classification (class/year in school), high school GPA, high school rank, SAT verbal scores, SAT mathematical scores (math), gender, race and major.
What is more, Popper's approach has been shown to be unworkable, for many reasons but not the least of which is that it is not possible to avoid inductive reasoning (14, 15).
Mental fatigue is associated with reduced inductive reasoning, as operationalised by a lower number of card sorts.
The type of inductive reasoning used in Shona riddles is, therefore argument from analogy.
In exploratory designs, inductive reasoning is quite useful and necessary where a base of non-theory-driven empirical work is present (see Strong, 1991 for a discussion of naive empiricism).
The qualitative tradition is based on inductive reasoning (see Figure 2).
Inductive reasoning makes broad assumptions based on known facts (e.
The problem was that these retrospective studies started with a population of children who had diagnosed problems, went back in time to identify one common risk factor (anoxia), and then used inductive reasoning to generalize about future cases.
Inductive reasoning is also the basis of the epistemological appeal of the Qur'an.
The inductive reasoning program helped them recognize patterns in order to predict what should come next.
David Hume (1739/1964), an eighteenth-century philosopher, first exposed the problem, demonstrating that inductive reasoning is fallible: However many instances of a correlation we may have observed, it is logically possible that the next instance will be different.