Inductive reasoning

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Inductive reasoning

The attempt to use information about a specific situation to draw a conclusion.

Inductive Reasoning

A way of forming reasonable conclusions by gathering evidence and then forming principles based upon them. For example, if one wishes to find out how a stock will perform, one gathers as much evidence on that stock as possible and makes a conclusion based on that, regardless of one's feelings or suppositions beforehand. The advantage of inductive reasoning is that its evidence offers applicability to "real world" scenarios; however, a disadvantage is that one's evidence may be inaccurate or anecdotal. It is sometimes difficult to know how much evidence is needed to justify coming to a general conclusion. See also: Deductive reasoning, Analogy.
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The following sections presents the evolution of tools and techniques from inductive logic programming and relational data mining through special purpose systems for bioinformatics to general purpose semantic data mining approaches which enable the use of domain ontologies as background knowledge for data analysis.
While there are many examples were a science split from philosophy and became autonomous (such as physics with Newton and biology with Darwin), and while there are, perhaps, topics that are of exclusively philosophical interest, inductive logic - as this handbook attests - is a research field where philosophers and scientists fruitfully and constructively interact.
The last part of the text deals with supplemental material such as informal fallacies, modal logic, and inductive logic.
In "Mill on Induction and Scientific Method" Geoffrey Scarre traces the dependence of Mill's account of scientific method on his account of inductive logic, explains Mill's principles of induction, and contrasts Mill's inductive conception of scientific method with William Whewell's neo-Kantian conception.
Alexander Broadie's fifty-page introduction clearly establishes the importance of Reid in bringing the inductive logic of Bacon to the forefront of natural philosophy.
For instance, where Paris (151) calls upon the next generation to overcome the dark age in which inductive logic went out of fashion and to bridge the gaps between Carnap's and Kemeny's work and the new results in AI and Cognitive Science, Haack suggests more or less the opposite, guided by the thought that 'supportiveness of evidence does not depend on [logical] form alone' (89).
Tokyo University of Science Named Sun Center of in Biological Data Mining -- Professor Fumio Mizoguchi's Information Media Center has been named a Sun COE in Biological Data Mining, which will combine research in a number of Artificial Intelligence, computer science and computational biology technologies: Inductive Logic Programming, Java(TM), Visualization tools and Sun(TM) One Grid Engine, among others.