Inductive reasoning

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Related to Inductive argument: inductive reasoning, Deductive argument

Inductive reasoning

The attempt to use information about a specific situation to draw a conclusion.

Inductive Reasoning

A way of forming reasonable conclusions by gathering evidence and then forming principles based upon them. For example, if one wishes to find out how a stock will perform, one gathers as much evidence on that stock as possible and makes a conclusion based on that, regardless of one's feelings or suppositions beforehand. The advantage of inductive reasoning is that its evidence offers applicability to "real world" scenarios; however, a disadvantage is that one's evidence may be inaccurate or anecdotal. It is sometimes difficult to know how much evidence is needed to justify coming to a general conclusion. See also: Deductive reasoning, Analogy.
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So if the size of the set of examples is too large to list, for the inductive argument to be properly formed one must consider a representative sample.
The explanation of an inductive argument offered by students in the video was not articulated as clearly as was the Case 1 Argument and, thus, required more attentive listening to make sense of what the students were trying to say, as they elaborated on the pattern that they noticed and why it worked, to explain the doubling of the number of towers as their height increased by one.
What we loosely refer to as good judgment is, in fact, proficiency with inductive arguments gained through experience with value principles.
It is fairly widely acknowledged that inductive arguments for the reliability of induction are in some sense unacceptably circular, even if the arguments do not involve the premise that induction is a truth-conducive inference form.
The ID inductive argument can therefore be restated as follows:
It outlines Hume's skeptical critiques which show the inductive argument form to be invalid, thereby generating the problem of induction.
The thesis that nature is uniform is contingent, so the claim that the premises of an inductive argument are reasons to believe its conclusion if nature is uniform is an example of misconditionalisation.
The connection with decision theory is close, for just as in decision theory, when measuring expected utility, we should employ objective chances rather than subjective probabilities expressing our beliefs about them, so too what matters for the warrant of an inductive argument is the objective chance of its conclusion being true rather than the subjective probability which expresses our belief that it is true.
It reorders different kinds of inductive arguments for better flow between topics, reorganizes some sections, and omits the more difficult and confusing topics.
In other words, premises of inductive arguments are experienced but their conclusion is not experienced.
E McKenzie's "Printers of the Mind" (1969) and his challenge to the inductive arguments of the New Bibliographers, supported by documents reporting the work of actual compositors in real printing houses.
Another section that should prove valuable to those who are interested in the logic and force of inductive arguments based upon experience concerns what Tuominen dubs the "sorties" argument (pp.