Indian Rupee


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Indian Rupee

The currency of India. Prior to the independence of India, there were various Indian rupees and other currencies in circulation, many issued by different colonial powers. The modern rupee is descended from the rupee issued by the British. It was pegged to gold for much of its history, finally floating after the end of the Bretton Woods System in 1971.
References in periodicals archive ?
This made traders sellof stocks and also pushed the Indian rupee down.
Financial Institutions Association of Bhutan head and BNB MD Kipchu Tshering said that the non-availability of the Indian Rupee has created quite a problem for everybody as companies and people cannot use the Rupee they deposited to pay back loans to the banks and that meant more Non Performing Loans.
The Exchange's Indian Rupee Quanto which was recently recognised by the Futures and Options World (FOW) as the 'Most Innovative Currency Contract in Asia', recorded a significant volume growth of 57 per cent year-on-year, trading an average of 24,591 contracts per day.
Launching Indian Rupee during Diwali marks the next phase of our roll-out, as we continue to improve liquidity and add more emerging market currencies to the R5FX marketplace," said Jon Vollemaere, CEO of R5FX.
The first green Indian rupee bond to be issued outside of India is to be issued on the London Stock Exchange (LSE) by International Finance Corporation (IFC).
The Indian rupee recently faced the jolts and is still seen as vulnerable against the major currencies of the world," BCICAI chairman Sanjay Gupta said.
Asked what is responsible for the Indian rupee dropping to a historic low of 62 to the dollar today, they said: "It is a result of something happening in the United States and worldwide.
The dealers said during the early hours of trading Indian rupee plunges 62.
Card companies allow foreign airlines to select the country and currency of their choice for the sale of air tickets in Indian rupees.
The daily high follows the DGCX Indian Rupee futures' fourth straight monthly volume record of 69,917 contracts set in September 2010.
Month-end dollar demand from importers also put pressure on the Indian rupee.
After the territory was captured by British forces in 1916 and removed from the Ottoman Empire, the British made the Indian rupee the official currency and retired the Ottoman pound.