Incumbent

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Incumbent

Any officer in a company, especially a large corporation. Incumbents include the CEO, managing director, and members of the board of directors. Corporations usually must provide an incumbency certificate, which lists the names and positions of the corporation's officers, on demand of any member of the public.
References in periodicals archive ?
Selectmen, two, three-year seats, incumbents James LeBlanc and Michael Dziokonski;
Privatisation of Ukraine's fixed-line incumbent has also been delayed again, this time by the need to adopt a new privatisation program.
In the most contentious race - for three seats on the Newhall County Water District board - incumbents Barbara Dore and Maria Gutzheit took the early lead as did B.
Comsearch is uniquely qualified--by virtue of our extensive experience in the PCS bands, our proprietary software and databases, and our vast program management resources--to offer the most cost-effective and time-saving incumbent relocation solutions.
In the Antelope Valley Union High School District race for three seats, incumbents Al Beattie and Jim Lott and retired teacher Ira Simonds were ahead.
In addition to the achievements noted above, 50% of all Phase 1 incumbents for Waves 1 and 2 have moved to their new channel assignments within the 800 MHz band.
That race features all three incumbents and three challengers.
1 GHz auction participants formulate sound spectrum bidding strategies, perform detailed spectrum sharing and relocation analyses, and develop plans to accelerate deployment and minimize interference to incumbents.
Nomination papers are available in the town clerk's office for new candidates and incumbents.
GLENDALE - Incumbents Greg Krikorian and Chuck Sambar and a challenger were leading Tuesday in the race for three seats on the Glendale Unified School District board, according to absentee returns.
The game theoretic approach would allow for the development of theoretical equilibria based on the credibility of threats and retaliations by the entrants and incumbents, as well as on the possibility for developing competitive or collusive outcomes.
Given this voter consistency and the fact that most districts are not level playing fields, most elections are decided during the decennial redistricting (or "incumbent protection") process--that is, when Democrats and Republicans blatantly carve up the political map to protect incumbents, creating noncompetitive districts "safe" from changing parties.