Nonconvertible Currency

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Nonconvertible Currency

A currency that may not be converted into another currency on the foreign exchange market, or that may be converted only in limited amounts. Some countries limit convertibility to prevent citizens from making bad investment decisions in, say, a country experiencing hyperinflation, while a few communist countries issue nonconvertible currencies to protect their citizens from capitalist influences. A nonconvertible currency is generally traded only on the black market. It is also called a blocked currency or an inconvertible currency.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Congress adopted the Legal Tender Act in February 1862, which legalised the government's ability to issue inconvertible paper money (the greenback) and the legal amount reached US$400 millions in March 1863.
In Europe and the United States, governments progressively implemented the classical specie regime after periods of Revolutionary, Napoleonic or Civil wars, during which the inconvertible paper money regime had prevailed.
Ricardo also implies that there is no difference between inconvertible paper money and convertible money certificates.
19) This is so, because inconvertible paper money presents a claim on an indeterminate amount, while a (convertible) money certificate is a claim on a clearly defined sum.
All this currency, he concluded, "was an inconvertible paper money issued without the sanction of law, an anachronism in our time, yet necessitated by conditions for which our banking laws did not provide.
In Buenos Aires, the government printed large amounts of inconvertible paper money to finance increasing fiscal deficits.
They are a precursor of the inconvertible paper money that was introduced in the region more than a decade after the 1810 Revolution.
We have now experienced the defects of one century of American central banking--and the predatory consequences of almost one-half century of American inconvertible paper money.
Inconvertible paper money, via its impact on total spending, determines domestic prices.