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Body

The main part of a document or advertisement. The body provides the most detailed information compared to other parts of a document. Especially in marketing, it is intended to elicit the desired response from the reader.
References in periodicals archive ?
3% (6 birds) showed inclusion bodies in the liver associated with severe hepatic necrosis and compatible with herpesvirus-like infection.
On histologic examination, intranuclear inclusion bodies consistent with those of APV were observed in the liver, spleen, and kidneys.
Necrotizing lesions and cells containing inclusion bodies were found sporadically in the lung, trachea, intestinal epithelium, and pancreas of some birds.
Labeling of inclusion bodies and some intracytoplasmic staining was notable from the forebrain (prosencephalon) to the mesencephalon (Figure, panel A).
The livers showed centrilobular necrosis, with some inflammatory cellular infiltration and prominent inclusion bodies in the hepatocytes (Figure 2B).
Many hepatocytes, particularly in the areas of degeneration, contained round to oval-shaped basophilic inclusion bodies of various sizes in the cytoplasm.
Histopathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies associated with a heavy infiltration of heterophils, lymphocytes, and fewer plasma cells.
Cytoplasmic and nuclear acidophilic inclusion bodies were detected in respiratory epithelial cells, gastric surface mucous and chief cells, intestinal crypt epithelial cells, and hepatic and pancreatic duct epithelial cells.
Basophilic inclusion bodies were seen in the abovementioned organs, as well as in the pancreas and the kidneys of the Verreaux's eagle owl.
This device was designed to recover virus in a high state of purity from 100-L batches of crude influenza vaccine in an 8-hour day (11,12) and subsequently was used for the large-scale purification of the hepatitis B (Australia) surface antigen (13,14) from human serum for use as a vactine and for mass isolation of polyhedral inclusion bodies (15).
Inclusion bodies were present in various organs, especially the bursa of Fabricius.
Only the cells derived from the patient serum-inoculated tissue culture expressed fluorescent inclusion bodies (Figure 1).