Illiquid Market

(redirected from Illiquid Markets)

Illiquid Market

A market in which that is difficult to sell assets because of their expense, lack of interested buyers, or some other reason. Examples of illiquid markets include real estate, some stocks with low trading volume, or collectibles. Assets in illiquid markets still have value and, in many cases, very high value, but are simply difficult to sell. See also: Liquid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our goal is to give our clients the ability to access pre-trade price data which can be used to help facilitate trades in increasingly illiquid markets," said Usman Khan, Chief Technology Officer and co-founder, Algomi.
Investing overseas involves special risks, including the volatility of currency exchange rates, and in some cases, political and economic instability, and relatively illiquid markets.
Some parties have strong opinion that fair value accounting has a major contribution in strengthen credit crises, specially pointing to the obvious difficulties of measuring the fair values of subprime positions in the current illiquid markets and the feedback effects noted above.
OConstraint will be driven by illiquid markets and the shrinking balance sheet capacity of international banks to lend significant sources of new money.
It is also best to avoid illiquid markets, such as Bahrain and Oman, when the grizzlies rule the roost.
The investment universe comprises all the currencies of the MSCI World and MSCI Emerging Markets indices, with the exception of some illiquid markets.
But investors have been worried by the shallow, sometimes illiquid markets of the Mena region.
The sheer number of new funds implies that many ETFs are covering the same index but also that a multitude of funds are now covering very narrow or exotic market segments, often resulting in high costs, illiquid markets and non-transparent investments.
Hence, when illiquid markets that finance investment funds during the crisis hardened, the funds were no longer able to meet the requests imposed by investment banks, thus becoming propagators of systemic risk.
The credit-crunch which forced the very significant downturn in economies around the globe had a devastating impact and was reflected in the huge losses in most stock markets around the world with only smaller illiquid markets, such as Namibia's own local index not being immediately affected.
It's worth noting that the existing fair value rules still stand; these FSPs provide additional implementation guidance on valuing assets in illiquid markets, the likes of which could not have been anticipated when the mark-to-market accounting rules were first contemplated.
Ed Yingling, ABA president and CEO, noted that the ABA was pleased that the FASB had quickly published its proposed improvements for estimating market values in illiquid markets and changing the accounting for "Other Than Temporary Impairment" (OTTI).