International Fund for Agricultural Development

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Related to IFAD: WFP

International Fund for Agricultural Development

An agency of the United Nations that provides loans and grants to developing countries for agricultural purposes. It aims to improve food security and thereby to eliminate rural poverty in the developing world. It was established in 1977 and is based in Rome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 90 per cent of the countrys water is used for agriculture, said Hubert Boirard, IFADs Country Programme Manager for Pakistan.
IFAD is an international financial institution and a specialised agency of the United Nations dedicated to eradicate poverty and hunger in rural areas of developing countries.
The workshop was organized by the Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform in collaboration with the IFAD.
The Program, developed by Yemen's Government of National Reconciliation with support from the EU, IsDB, WB and IFAD, aims to enable the country to successfully implement its political transition and accelerate economic recovery.
He stated that IFAD was proud to be a partner of the Zambian people and government in working together to foster agriculture development.
With this latest project, IFAD will have financed four projects in Lebanon worth a total of $36.
IFAD has also offered Arab countries grants of around $15 million to support 65 projects for research and development of water resources.
This is Nwanze's first visit to the Kingdom after he took over as IFAD chief a couple of months ago with a mandate to map out new strategies to boost investment in the agricultural sector.
The latest loan agreement was signed yesterday at IFAD headquarters in Rome by the Ambassador of El Salvador Jose Roberto Andino Salazar and IFAD President Kanayo Nwanze.
Millions of rural Africans are the poorest people in the world, says IFAD President Lennart Bage, warning that agriculture gets the least attention from the ruling elite, despite employing 70%-80% of Africans and, generating 60% of the continent's exports.
That's because 75 percent of the world's poorest people live in remote, rural areas in Africa, Asia, and Latin America--exactly those hard-to-reach areas where IFAD does its work, and that most other development groups overlook.
The new framework of co-operation will be built on a long history of co-operation between the Commission and the IFAD.